Glibc syscalls now block properly (XCC)
[akaros.git] / user / parlib / vcore.c
index 405f6e1..6085e80 100644 (file)
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ static void free_transition_stack(int id)
 
 static int allocate_transition_stack(int id)
 {
-       struct preempt_data *vcpd = &__procdata.vcore_preempt_data[id];
+       struct preempt_data *vcpd = vcpd_of(id);
        if (vcpd->transition_stack)
                return 0; // reuse old stack
 
@@ -130,8 +130,8 @@ int vcore_init()
        if(allocate_transition_stack(0) || allocate_transition_tls(0))
                goto vcore_init_tls_fail;
 
-       /* Initialize our VCPD event queues' ucqs, two pages per vcore */
-       mmap_block = (uintptr_t)mmap(0, PGSIZE * 2 * max_vcores(),
+       /* Initialize our VCPD event queues' ucqs, two pages per ucq, 4 per vcore */
+       mmap_block = (uintptr_t)mmap(0, PGSIZE * 4 * max_vcores(),
                                     PROT_WRITE | PROT_READ,
                                     MAP_POPULATE | MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0);
        /* Yeah, this doesn't fit in the error-handling scheme, but this whole
@@ -141,10 +141,13 @@ int vcore_init()
        /* Note we may end up doing vcore 0's elsewhere, for _Ss, or else have a
         * separate ev_q for that. */
        for (int i = 0; i < max_vcores(); i++) {
-               /* two pages each from the big block */
-               ucq_init_raw(&__procdata.vcore_preempt_data[i].ev_mbox.ev_msgs,
-                            mmap_block + (2 * i    ) * PGSIZE, 
-                            mmap_block + (2 * i + 1) * PGSIZE); 
+               /* four pages total for both ucqs from the big block (2 pages each) */
+               ucq_init_raw(&vcpd_of(i)->ev_mbox_public.ev_msgs,
+                            mmap_block + (4 * i    ) * PGSIZE,
+                            mmap_block + (4 * i + 1) * PGSIZE);
+               ucq_init_raw(&vcpd_of(i)->ev_mbox_private.ev_msgs,
+                            mmap_block + (4 * i + 2) * PGSIZE,
+                            mmap_block + (4 * i + 3) * PGSIZE);
        }
        atomic_init(&vc_req_being_handled, 0);
        assert(!in_vcore_context());
@@ -160,10 +163,59 @@ vcore_init_fail:
        return -1;
 }
 
+/* this, plus tricking gcc into thinking this is -u (undefined), AND including
+ * the event_init in it, causes the linker to need to check parlib.a and see the
+ * strong symbol... */
+void force_parlib_symbols(void)
+{
+       vcore_event_init();
+       assert(0);
+}
+
+/* This gets called in glibc before calling the programs 'main'.  Need to set
+ * ourselves up so that thread0 is a uthread, and then register basic signals to
+ * go to vcore 0. */
+void vcore_event_init(void)
+{
+       /* set up our thread0 as a uthread */
+       uthread_slim_init();
+       /* TODO: register for other kevents/signals and whatnot (can probably reuse
+        * the simple ev_q).  Could also do this via explicit functions from the
+        * program. */
+}
+
+/* Helper, picks some sane defaults and changes the process into an MCP */
+void vcore_change_to_m(void)
+{
+       __procdata.res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = 1;
+       __procdata.res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted_min = 1;       /* whatever */
+       assert(!in_multi_mode());
+       assert(!in_vcore_context());
+       assert(!sys_change_to_m());
+       assert(in_multi_mode());
+       assert(!in_vcore_context());
+}
+
 /* Returns -1 with errno set on error, or 0 on success.  This does not return
  * the number of cores actually granted (though some parts of the kernel do
  * internally).
  *
+ * This tries to get "more vcores", based on the number we currently have.
+ * We'll probably need smarter 2LSs in the future that just directly set
+ * amt_wanted.  What happens is we can have a bunch of 2LS vcore contexts
+ * trying to get "another vcore", which currently means more than num_vcores().
+ * If you have someone ask for two more, and then someone else ask for one more,
+ * how many you ultimately ask for depends on if the kernel heard you and
+ * adjusted num_vcores in between the two calls.  Or maybe your amt_wanted
+ * already was num_vcores + 5, so neither call is telling the kernel anything
+ * new.  It comes down to "one more than I have" vs "one more than I've already
+ * asked for".
+ *
+ * So for now, this will keep the older behavior (one more than I have).  It
+ * will try to accumulate any concurrent requests, and adjust amt_wanted up.
+ * Interleaving, repetitive calls (everyone asking for one more) may get
+ * ignored.
+ *
  * Note the doesn't block or anything (despite the min number requested is
  * 1), since the kernel won't block the call.
  *
@@ -206,12 +258,14 @@ try_handle_it:
                /* We got a 1 back, so someone else is already working on it */
                return 0;
        }
-handle_it:
-       /* So now we're the ones supposed to handle things.  Figure out how many we
-        * have, though this is racy.  Yields/preempts/grants will change this over
-        * time, and we may end up asking for less than we had. */
+       /* So now we're the ones supposed to handle things.  This does things in the
+        * "increment based on the number we have", vs "increment on the number we
+        * said we want".
+        *
+        * Figure out how many we have, though this is racy.  Yields/preempts/grants
+        * will change this over time, and we may end up asking for less than we
+        * had. */
        nr_vcores_wanted = num_vcores();
-       cmb();  /* force a reread of num_vcores() later */
        /* Pull all of the vcores wanted into our local variable, where we'll deal
         * with prepping/requesting that many vcores.  Keep doing this til we think
         * no more are wanted. */
@@ -220,7 +274,7 @@ handle_it:
                /* Don't bother prepping or asking for more than we can ever get */
                nr_vcores_wanted = MIN(nr_vcores_wanted, max_vcores());
                /* Make sure all we might ask for are prepped */
-               for(long i = _max_vcores_ever_wanted; i < nr_vcores_wanted; i++) {
+               for (long i = _max_vcores_ever_wanted; i < nr_vcores_wanted; i++) {
                        if (allocate_transition_stack(i) || allocate_transition_tls(i)) {
                                atomic_set(&vc_req_being_handled, 0);   /* unlock and bail out*/
                                return -1;
@@ -228,16 +282,21 @@ handle_it:
                        _max_vcores_ever_wanted++;      /* done in the loop to handle failures*/
                }
        }
-       /* Got all the ones we can get, let's submit it to the kernel.  We check
-        * against num_vcores() one last time, though we still have some races... */
-       if (nr_vcores_wanted > num_vcores()) {
-               sys_resource_req(RES_CORES, nr_vcores_wanted, 1, 0);
-               cmb();  /* force a reread of num_vcores() at handle_it: */
-               goto handle_it;
-       }
-       /* Here, we believe there are none left to do */
+       cmb();  /* force a reread of num_vcores() */
+       /* Update amt_wanted if we now want *more* than what the kernel already
+        * knows.  See notes in the func doc. */
+       if (nr_vcores_wanted > __procdata.res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted)
+               __procdata.res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = nr_vcores_wanted;
+       /* If num_vcores isn't what we want, we can poke the ksched.  Due to some
+        * races with yield, our desires may be old.  Not a big deal; any vcores
+        * that pop up will just end up yielding (or get preempt messages.)  */
+       if (nr_vcores_wanted > num_vcores())
+               sys_poke_ksched(RES_CORES);
+       /* Unlock, (which lets someone else work), and check to see if more work
+        * needs to be done.  If so, we'll make sure it gets handled. */
        atomic_set(&vc_req_being_handled, 0);   /* unlock, to allow others to try */
-       /* Double check for any that might have come in while we were out */
+       wrmb();
+       /* check for any that might have come in while we were out */
        if (atomic_read(&nr_new_vcores_wanted))
                goto try_handle_it;
        return 0;
@@ -247,7 +306,7 @@ handle_it:
 void vcore_yield(bool preempt_pending)
 {
        uint32_t vcoreid = vcore_id();
-       struct preempt_data *vcpd = &__procdata.vcore_preempt_data[vcoreid];
+       struct preempt_data *vcpd = vcpd_of(vcoreid);
        vcpd->can_rcv_msg = FALSE;
        /* no wrmb() necessary, clear_notif() has an mb() */
        /* Clears notif pending.  If we had an event outstanding, this will handle
@@ -262,6 +321,13 @@ void vcore_yield(bool preempt_pending)
                vcpd->can_rcv_msg = TRUE;
                return;
        }
+       /* Tell the kernel we want one less vcore.  If yield fails (slight race), we
+        * may end up having more vcores than amt_wanted for a while, and might lose
+        * one later on (after a preempt/timeslicing) - the 2LS will have to notice
+        * eventually if it actually needs more vcores (which it already needs to
+        * do).  We need to atomically decrement, though I don't want the kernel's
+        * data type here to be atomic_t (only userspace cares in this one case). */
+       __sync_fetch_and_sub(&__procdata.res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted, 1);
        /* We can probably yield.  This may pop back up if notif_pending became set
         * by the kernel after we cleared it and we lost the race. */
        sys_yield(preempt_pending);
@@ -274,12 +340,16 @@ void vcore_yield(bool preempt_pending)
  * events, and we will have send pending to 0. 
  *
  * Note that this won't catch every race/case of an incoming event.  Future
- * events will get caught in pop_ros_tf() or proc_yield() */
+ * events will get caught in pop_ros_tf() or proc_yield().
+ *
+ * Also note that this handles events, which may change your current uthread or
+ * might not return!  Be careful calling this.  Check run_uthread for an example
+ * of how to use this. */
 bool clear_notif_pending(uint32_t vcoreid)
 {
        bool handled_event = FALSE;
        do {
-               __procdata.vcore_preempt_data[vcoreid].notif_pending = 0;
+               vcpd_of(vcoreid)->notif_pending = 0;
                /* need a full mb(), since handle events might be just a read or might
                 * be a write, either way, it needs to happen after notif_pending */
                mb();
@@ -299,8 +369,8 @@ void enable_notifs(uint32_t vcoreid)
        /* Note we could get migrated before executing this.  If that happens, our
         * vcore had gone into vcore context (which is what we wanted), and this
         * self_notify to our old vcore is spurious and harmless. */
-       if (__procdata.vcore_preempt_data[vcoreid].notif_pending)
-               sys_self_notify(vcoreid, EV_NONE, 0);
+       if (vcpd_of(vcoreid)->notif_pending)
+               sys_self_notify(vcoreid, EV_NONE, 0, TRUE);
 }
 
 /* Helper to disable notifs.  It simply checks to make sure we disabled uthread
@@ -323,3 +393,63 @@ void __attribute__((noreturn)) vcore_idle(void)
                cpu_relax();
        }
 }
+
+/* Helper, that actually makes sure a vcore is running.  Call this is you really
+ * want vcoreid.  More often, you'll want to call the regular version. */
+static void __ensure_vcore_runs(uint32_t vcoreid)
+{
+       if (vcore_is_preempted(vcoreid)) {
+               printd("[vcore]: VC %d changing to VC %d\n", vcore_id(), vcoreid);
+               /* Note that at this moment, the vcore could still be mapped (we're
+                * racing with __preempt.  If that happens, we'll just fail the
+                * sys_change_vcore(), and next time __ensure runs we'll get it. */
+               /* We want to recover them from preemption.  Since we know they have
+                * notifs disabled, they will need to be directly restarted, so we can
+                * skip the other logic and cut straight to the sys_change_vcore() */
+               sys_change_vcore(vcoreid, FALSE);
+       }
+}
+
+/* Helper, looks for any preempted vcores, making sure each of them runs at some
+ * point.  This is pretty heavy-weight, and should be used to help get out of
+ * weird deadlocks (spinning in vcore context, waiting on another vcore).  If
+ * you might know which vcore you are waiting on, use ensure_vc_runs. */
+static void __ensure_all_run(void)
+{
+       for (int i = 0; i < max_vcores(); i++)
+               __ensure_vcore_runs(i);
+}
+
+/* Makes sure a vcore is running.  If it is preempted, we'll switch to
+ * it.  This will return, either immediately if the vcore is running, or later
+ * when someone preempt-recovers us.
+ *
+ * If you pass in your own vcoreid, this will make sure all other preempted
+ * vcores run. */
+void ensure_vcore_runs(uint32_t vcoreid)
+{
+       /* if the vcoreid is ourselves, make sure everyone else is running */
+       if (vcoreid == vcore_id()) {
+               __ensure_all_run();
+               return;
+       }
+       __ensure_vcore_runs(vcoreid);
+}
+
+#define NR_RELAX_SPINS 1000
+/* If you are spinning in vcore context and it is likely that you don't know who
+ * you are waiting on, call this.  It will spin for a bit before firing up the
+ * potentially expensive __ensure_all_run().  Don't call this from uthread
+ * context.  sys_change_vcore will probably mess you up. */
+void cpu_relax_vc(uint32_t vcoreid)
+{
+       static __thread unsigned int spun;              /* vcore TLS */
+       assert(in_vcore_context());
+       spun = 0;
+       if (spun++ >= NR_RELAX_SPINS) {
+               /* if vcoreid == vcore_id(), this might be expensive */
+               ensure_vcore_runs(vcoreid);
+               spun = 0;
+       }
+       cpu_relax();
+}