alarm: Do not hold the tchain lock during handlers
[akaros.git] / kern / src / schedule.c
index ff8d04e..4804885 100644 (file)
@@ -4,11 +4,8 @@
  *
  * Scheduling and dispatching. */
 
-#ifdef __SHARC__
-#pragma nosharc
-#endif
-
 #include <schedule.h>
+#include <corerequest.h>
 #include <process.h>
 #include <monitor.h>
 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <manager.h>
 #include <alarm.h>
 #include <sys/queue.h>
+#include <arsc_server.h>
+#include <hashtable.h>
 
-/* Process Lists */
+/* Process Lists.  'unrunnable' is a holding list for SCPs that are running or
+ * waiting or otherwise not considered for sched decisions. */
+struct proc_list unrunnable_scps = TAILQ_HEAD_INITIALIZER(unrunnable_scps);
 struct proc_list runnable_scps = TAILQ_HEAD_INITIALIZER(runnable_scps);
-struct proc_list all_mcps = TAILQ_HEAD_INITIALIZER(all_mcps);
-spinlock_t sched_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER;
-
-// This could be useful for making scheduling decisions.  
-/* Physical coremap: each index is a physical core id, with a proc ptr for
- * whoever *should be or is* running.  Very similar to current, which is what
- * process is *really* running there. */
-struct proc *pcoremap[MAX_NUM_CPUS];
-
-/* Tracks which cores are idle, similar to the vcoremap.  Each value is the
- * physical coreid of an unallocated core. */
-spinlock_t idle_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER;
-uint32_t idlecoremap[MAX_NUM_CPUS];
-uint32_t num_idlecores = 0;
-uint32_t num_mgmtcores = 1;
+/* mcp lists.  we actually could get by with one list and a TAILQ_CONCAT, but
+ * I'm expecting to want the flexibility of the pointers later. */
+struct proc_list all_mcps_1 = TAILQ_HEAD_INITIALIZER(all_mcps_1);
+struct proc_list all_mcps_2 = TAILQ_HEAD_INITIALIZER(all_mcps_2);
+struct proc_list *primary_mcps = &all_mcps_1;
+struct proc_list *secondary_mcps = &all_mcps_2;
 
 /* Helper, defined below */
-static void __core_request(struct proc *p);
-static void __put_idle_cores(uint32_t *pc_arr, uint32_t num);
+static void __core_request(struct proc *p, uint32_t amt_needed);
+static void add_to_list(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *list);
+static void remove_from_list(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *list);
+static void switch_lists(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *old,
+                         struct proc_list *new);
+static void __run_mcp_ksched(void *arg);       /* don't call directly */
+static uint32_t get_cores_needed(struct proc *p);
+
+/* Locks / sync tools */
+
+/* poke-style ksched - ensures the MCP ksched only runs once at a time.  since
+ * only one mcp ksched runs at a time, while this is set, the ksched knows no
+ * cores are being allocated by other code (though they could be dealloc, due to
+ * yield).
+ *
+ * The main value to this sync method is to make the 'make sure the ksched runs
+ * only once at a time and that it actually runs' invariant/desire wait-free, so
+ * that it can be called anywhere (deep event code, etc).
+ *
+ * As the ksched gets smarter, we'll probably embedd this poker in a bigger
+ * struct that can handle the posting of different types of work. */
+struct poke_tracker ksched_poker = POKE_INITIALIZER(__run_mcp_ksched);
+
+/* this 'big ksched lock' protects a bunch of things, which i may make fine
+ * grained: */
+/* - protects the integrity of proc tailqs/structures, as well as the membership
+ * of a proc on those lists.  proc lifetime within the ksched but outside this
+ * lock is protected by the proc kref. */
+//spinlock_t proclist_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER; /* subsumed by bksl */
+/* - protects the provisioning assignment, and the integrity of all prov
+ * lists (the lists of each proc). */
+//spinlock_t prov_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER;
+/* - protects allocation structures */
+//spinlock_t alloc_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER;
+spinlock_t sched_lock = SPINLOCK_INITIALIZER;
 
 /* Alarm struct, for our example 'timer tick' */
 struct alarm_waiter ksched_waiter;
@@ -54,132 +79,202 @@ static void set_ksched_alarm(void)
        set_alarm(&per_cpu_info[core_id()].tchain, &ksched_waiter);
 }
 
-/* Kmsg, to run the scheduler tick (not in interrupt context) and reset the
+/* RKM alarm, to run the scheduler tick (not in interrupt context) and reset the
  * alarm.  Note that interrupts will be disabled, but this is not the same as
  * interrupt context.  We're a routine kmsg, which means the core is in a
  * quiescent state. */
-static void __ksched_tick(struct trapframe *tf, uint32_t srcid, long a0,
-                          long a1, long a2)
+static void __ksched_tick(struct alarm_waiter *waiter)
 {
        /* TODO: imagine doing some accounting here */
-       schedule();
-       /* Set our alarm to go off, incrementing from our last tick (instead of
-        * setting it relative to now, since some time has passed since the alarm
-        * first went off.  Note, this may be now or in the past! */
-       set_awaiter_inc(&ksched_waiter, TIMER_TICK_USEC);
+       run_scheduler();
+       /* Set our alarm to go off, relative to now.  This means we might lag a bit,
+        * and our ticks won't match wall clock time.  But if we do incremental,
+        * we'll actually punish the next process because the kernel took too long
+        * for the previous process.  Ultimately, if we really care, we should
+        * account for the actual time used. */
+       set_awaiter_rel(&ksched_waiter, TIMER_TICK_USEC);
        set_alarm(&per_cpu_info[core_id()].tchain, &ksched_waiter);
 }
 
-/* Interrupt/alarm handler: tells our core to run the scheduler (out of
- * interrupt context). */
-static void __kalarm(struct alarm_waiter *waiter)
-{
-       send_kernel_message(core_id(), __ksched_tick, 0, 0, 0, KMSG_ROUTINE);
-}
-
 void schedule_init(void)
 {
-       TAILQ_INIT(&runnable_scps);
-       TAILQ_INIT(&all_mcps);
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
        assert(!core_id());             /* want the alarm on core0 for now */
-       init_awaiter(&ksched_waiter, __kalarm);
+       init_awaiter(&ksched_waiter, __ksched_tick);
        set_ksched_alarm();
+       corealloc_init();
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
 
-       /* Ghetto old idle core init */
-       /* Init idle cores. Core 0 is the management core. */
-       spin_lock(&idle_lock);
-#ifdef __CONFIG_DISABLE_SMT__
-       /* assumes core0 is the only management core (NIC and monitor functionality
-        * are run there too.  it just adds the odd cores to the idlecoremap */
-       assert(!(num_cpus % 2));
-       // TODO: consider checking x86 for machines that actually hyperthread
-       num_idlecores = num_cpus >> 1;
- #ifdef __CONFIG_ARSC_SERVER__
-       // Dedicate one core (core 2) to sysserver, might be able to share wit NIC
-       num_mgmtcores++;
-       assert(num_cpus >= num_mgmtcores);
-       send_kernel_message(2, (amr_t)arsc_server, 0,0,0, KMSG_ROUTINE);
- #endif
-       for (int i = 0; i < num_idlecores; i++)
-               idlecoremap[i] = (i * 2) + 1;
-#else
-       // __CONFIG_DISABLE_SMT__
-       #ifdef __CONFIG_NETWORKING__
-       num_mgmtcores++; // Next core is dedicated to the NIC
-       assert(num_cpus >= num_mgmtcores);
-       #endif
-       #ifdef __CONFIG_APPSERVER__
-       #ifdef __CONFIG_DEDICATED_MONITOR__
-       num_mgmtcores++; // Next core dedicated to running the kernel monitor
-       assert(num_cpus >= num_mgmtcores);
-       // Need to subtract 1 from the num_mgmtcores # to get the cores index
-       send_kernel_message(num_mgmtcores-1, (amr_t)monitor, 0,0,0, KMSG_ROUTINE);
-       #endif
-       #endif
- #ifdef __CONFIG_ARSC_SERVER__
-       // Dedicate one core (core 2) to sysserver, might be able to share with NIC
-       num_mgmtcores++;
-       assert(num_cpus >= num_mgmtcores);
-       send_kernel_message(num_mgmtcores-1, (amr_t)arsc_server, 0,0,0, KMSG_ROUTINE);
- #endif
-       num_idlecores = num_cpus - num_mgmtcores;
-       for (int i = 0; i < num_idlecores; i++)
-               idlecoremap[i] = i + num_mgmtcores;
-#endif /* __CONFIG_DISABLE_SMT__ */
-       spin_unlock(&idle_lock);
-       return;
+#ifdef CONFIG_ARSC_SERVER
+       /* Most likely we'll have a syscall and a process that dedicates itself to
+        * running this.  Or if it's a kthread, we don't need a core. */
+       #error "Find a way to get a core.  Probably a syscall to run a server."
+       int arsc_coreid = get_any_idle_core();
+       assert(arsc_coreid >= 0);
+       send_kernel_message(arsc_coreid, arsc_server, 0, 0, 0, KMSG_ROUTINE);
+       printk("Using core %d for the ARSC server\n", arsc_coreid);
+#endif /* CONFIG_ARSC_SERVER */
+}
+
+/* Round-robins on whatever list it's on */
+static void add_to_list(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *new)
+{
+       assert(!(p->ksched_data.cur_list));
+       TAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(new, p, ksched_data.proc_link);
+       p->ksched_data.cur_list = new;
+}
+
+static void remove_from_list(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *old)
+{
+       assert(p->ksched_data.cur_list == old);
+       TAILQ_REMOVE(old, p, ksched_data.proc_link);
+       p->ksched_data.cur_list = 0;
+}
+
+static void switch_lists(struct proc *p, struct proc_list *old,
+                         struct proc_list *new)
+{
+       remove_from_list(p, old);
+       add_to_list(p, new);
+}
+
+/* Removes from whatever list p is on */
+static void remove_from_any_list(struct proc *p)
+{
+       if (p->ksched_data.cur_list) {
+               TAILQ_REMOVE(p->ksched_data.cur_list, p, ksched_data.proc_link);
+               p->ksched_data.cur_list = 0;
+       }
 }
 
-/* TODO: the proc lock is currently held for sched and register, though not
- * currently in any situations that can deadlock */
-/* _S procs are scheduled like in traditional systems */
-void schedule_scp(struct proc *p)
+/************** Process Management Callbacks **************/
+/* a couple notes:
+ * - the proc lock is NOT held for any of these calls.  currently, there is no
+ *   lock ordering between the sched lock and the proc lock.  since the proc
+ *   code doesn't know what we do, it doesn't hold its lock when calling our
+ *   CBs.
+ * - since the proc lock isn't held, the proc could be dying, which means we
+ *   will receive a __sched_proc_destroy() either before or after some of these
+ *   other CBs.  the CBs related to list management need to check and abort if
+ *   DYING */
+void __sched_proc_register(struct proc *p)
 {
-       /* up the refcnt since we are storing the reference */
-       proc_incref(p, 1);
+       assert(!proc_is_dying(p));              /* shouldn't be able to happen yet */
+       /* one ref for the proc's existence, cradle-to-grave */
+       proc_incref(p, 1);      /* need at least this OR the 'one for existing' */
        spin_lock(&sched_lock);
-       printd("Scheduling PID: %d\n", p->pid);
-       TAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(&runnable_scps, p, proc_link);
+       corealloc_proc_init(p);
+       add_to_list(p, &unrunnable_scps);
        spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
 }
 
-/* important to only call this on RUNNING_S, for now */
-void register_mcp(struct proc *p)
+/* Returns 0 if it succeeded, an error code otherwise. */
+void __sched_proc_change_to_m(struct proc *p)
 {
-       proc_incref(p, 1);
        spin_lock(&sched_lock);
-       TAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(&all_mcps, p, proc_link);
+       /* Need to make sure they aren't dying.  if so, we already dealt with their
+        * list membership, etc (or soon will).  taking advantage of the 'immutable
+        * state' of dying (so long as refs are held). */
+       if (proc_is_dying(p)) {
+               spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+               return;
+       }
+       /* Catch user bugs */
+       if (!p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted) {
+               printk("[kernel] process needs to specify amt_wanted\n");
+               p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = 1;
+       }
+       /* For now, this should only ever be called on an unrunnable.  It's
+        * probably a bug, at this stage in development, to do o/w. */
+       remove_from_list(p, &unrunnable_scps);
+       //remove_from_any_list(p);      /* ^^ instead of this */
+       add_to_list(p, primary_mcps);
        spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
        //poke_ksched(p, RES_CORES);
 }
 
-/* Destroys the given process.  This may be called from another process, a light
- * kernel thread (no real process context), asynchronously/cross-core, or from
- * the process on its own core.
+/* Sched callback called when the proc dies.  pc_arr holds the cores the proc
+ * had, if any, and nr_cores tells us how many are in the array.
  *
  * An external, edible ref is passed in.  when we return and they decref,
- * __proc_free will be called */
-void proc_destroy(struct proc *p)
+ * __proc_free will be called (when the last one is done). */
+void __sched_proc_destroy(struct proc *p, uint32_t *pc_arr, uint32_t nr_cores)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       /* Unprovision any cores.  Note this is different than track_core_dealloc.
+        * The latter does bookkeeping when an allocation changes.  This is a
+        * bulk *provisioning* change. */
+       __unprovision_all_cores(p);
+       /* Remove from whatever list we are on (if any - might not be on one if it
+        * was in the middle of __run_mcp_sched) */
+       remove_from_any_list(p);
+       if (nr_cores)
+               __track_core_dealloc_bulk(p, pc_arr, nr_cores);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+       /* Drop the cradle-to-the-grave reference, jet-li */
+       proc_decref(p);
+}
+
+/* ksched callbacks.  p just woke up and is UNLOCKED. */
+void __sched_mcp_wakeup(struct proc *p)
 {
-       uint32_t nr_cores_revoked = 0;
        spin_lock(&sched_lock);
-       spin_lock(&p->proc_lock);
-       /* storage for pc_arr is alloced at decl, which is after grabbing the lock*/
-       uint32_t pc_arr[p->procinfo->num_vcores];
-       /* If this returns true, it means we successfully destroyed the proc */
-       if (__proc_destroy(p, pc_arr, &nr_cores_revoked)) {
-               /* Do our cleanup.  note that proc_free won't run since we have an
-                * external reference, passed in */
-               /* TODO: pull from lists (no list polling), free structs, etc. */
-
-               /* Put the cores back on the idlecore map.  For future changes, be
-                * careful with the idle_lock.  It's safe to call this here or outside
-                * the sched lock (for now). */
-               if (nr_cores_revoked) 
-                       put_idle_cores(pc_arr, nr_cores_revoked);
+       if (proc_is_dying(p)) {
+               spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+               return;
+       }
+       /* could try and prioritize p somehow (move it to the front of the list). */
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+       /* note they could be dying at this point too. */
+       poke(&ksched_poker, p);
+}
+
+/* ksched callbacks.  p just woke up and is UNLOCKED. */
+void __sched_scp_wakeup(struct proc *p)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       if (proc_is_dying(p)) {
+               spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+               return;
+       }
+       /* might not be on a list if it is new.  o/w, it should be unrunnable */
+       remove_from_any_list(p);
+       add_to_list(p, &runnable_scps);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+       /* we could be on a CG core, and all the mgmt cores could be halted.  if we
+        * don't tell one of them about the new proc, they will sleep until the
+        * timer tick goes off. */
+       if (!management_core()) {
+               /* TODO: pick a better core and only send if halted.
+                *
+                * ideally, we'd know if a specific mgmt core is sleeping and wake it
+                * up.  o/w, we could interrupt an already-running mgmt core that won't
+                * get to our new proc anytime soon.  also, by poking core 0, a
+                * different mgmt core could remain idle (and this process would sleep)
+                * until its tick goes off */
+               send_ipi(0, I_POKE_CORE);
        }
-       spin_unlock(&p->proc_lock);
+}
+
+/* Callback to return a core to the ksched, which tracks it as idle and
+ * deallocated from p.  The proclock is held (__core_req depends on that).
+ *
+ * This also is a trigger, telling us we have more cores.  We could/should make
+ * a scheduling decision (or at least plan to). */
+void __sched_put_idle_core(struct proc *p, uint32_t coreid)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       __track_core_dealloc(p, coreid);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+}
+
+/* Callback, bulk interface for put_idle. The proclock is held for this. */
+void __sched_put_idle_cores(struct proc *p, uint32_t *pc_arr, uint32_t num)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       __track_core_dealloc_bulk(p, pc_arr, num);
        spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+       /* could trigger a sched decision here */
 }
 
 /* mgmt/LL cores should call this to schedule the calling core and give it to an
@@ -187,115 +282,183 @@ void proc_destroy(struct proc *p)
  * calling.  returns TRUE if it scheduled a proc. */
 static bool __schedule_scp(void)
 {
+       // TODO: sort out lock ordering (proc_run_s also locks)
        struct proc *p;
        uint32_t pcoreid = core_id();
        struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[pcoreid];
-       int8_t state = 0;
-       /* prune any dying SCPs at the head of the queue and maybe sched our core
-        * (let all the cores do this, whoever happens to be running schedule()). */
-       while ((p = TAILQ_FIRST(&runnable_scps))) {
-               if (p->state == PROC_DYING) {
-                       TAILQ_REMOVE(&runnable_scps, p, proc_link);
-                       proc_decref(p);
-               } else {
-                       /* protect owning proc, cur_tf, etc.  note this nests with the
-                        * calls in proc_yield_s */
-                       disable_irqsave(&state);
-                       /* someone is currently running, dequeue them */
-                       if (pcpui->owning_proc) {
-                               printd("Descheduled %d in favor of %d\n",
-                                      pcpui->owning_proc->pid, p->pid);
-                               __proc_yield_s(pcpui->owning_proc, pcpui->cur_tf);
-                               /* round-robin the SCPs */
-                               TAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(&runnable_scps, pcpui->owning_proc,
-                                                 proc_link);
-                               /* could optimize the refcnting if we cared */
-                               proc_incref(pcpui->owning_proc, 1);
-                               clear_owning_proc(pcoreid);
-                               /* Note we abandon core.  It's not strictly necessary.  If
-                                * we didn't, the TLB would still be loaded with the old
-                                * one, til we proc_run_s, and the various paths in
-                                * proc_run_s would pick it up.  This way is a bit safer for
-                                * future changes, but has an extra (empty) TLB flush.  */
-                               abandon_core();
-                       } 
-                       /* Run the new proc */
-                       TAILQ_REMOVE(&runnable_scps, p, proc_link);
-                       printd("PID of the SCP i'm running: %d\n", p->pid);
-                       proc_run_s(p);  /* gives it core we're running on */
-                       proc_decref(p);
-                       enable_irqsave(&state);
-                       return TRUE;
+       /* if there are any runnables, run them here and put any currently running
+        * SCP on the tail of the runnable queue. */
+       if ((p = TAILQ_FIRST(&runnable_scps))) {
+               /* someone is currently running, dequeue them */
+               if (pcpui->owning_proc) {
+                       spin_lock(&pcpui->owning_proc->proc_lock);
+                       /* process might be dying, with a KMSG to clean it up waiting on
+                        * this core.  can't do much, so we'll attempt to restart */
+                       if (proc_is_dying(pcpui->owning_proc)) {
+                               run_as_rkm(run_scheduler);
+                               spin_unlock(&pcpui->owning_proc->proc_lock);
+                               return FALSE;
+                       }
+                       printd("Descheduled %d in favor of %d\n", pcpui->owning_proc->pid,
+                              p->pid);
+                       __proc_set_state(pcpui->owning_proc, PROC_RUNNABLE_S);
+                       /* Saving FP state aggressively.  Odds are, the SCP was hit by an
+                        * IRQ and has a HW ctx, in which case we must save. */
+                       __proc_save_fpu_s(pcpui->owning_proc);
+                       __proc_save_context_s(pcpui->owning_proc);
+                       vcore_account_offline(pcpui->owning_proc, 0);
+                       __seq_start_write(&p->procinfo->coremap_seqctr);
+                       __unmap_vcore(p, 0);
+                       __seq_end_write(&p->procinfo->coremap_seqctr);
+                       spin_unlock(&pcpui->owning_proc->proc_lock);
+                       /* round-robin the SCPs (inserts at the end of the queue) */
+                       switch_lists(pcpui->owning_proc, &unrunnable_scps, &runnable_scps);
+                       clear_owning_proc(pcoreid);
+                       /* Note we abandon core.  It's not strictly necessary.  If
+                        * we didn't, the TLB would still be loaded with the old
+                        * one, til we proc_run_s, and the various paths in
+                        * proc_run_s would pick it up.  This way is a bit safer for
+                        * future changes, but has an extra (empty) TLB flush.  */
+                       abandon_core();
                }
+               /* Run the new proc */
+               switch_lists(p, &runnable_scps, &unrunnable_scps);
+               printd("PID of the SCP i'm running: %d\n", p->pid);
+               proc_run_s(p);  /* gives it core we're running on */
+               return TRUE;
        }
        return FALSE;
 }
 
-/* Something has changed, and for whatever reason the scheduler should
- * reevaluate things. 
- *
- * Don't call this from interrupt context (grabs proclocks). */
-void schedule(void)
+/* Returns how many new cores p needs.  This doesn't lock the proc, so your
+ * answer might be stale. */
+static uint32_t get_cores_needed(struct proc *p)
+{
+       uint32_t amt_wanted, amt_granted;
+       amt_wanted = p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted;
+       /* Help them out - if they ask for something impossible, give them 1 so they
+        * can make some progress. (this is racy, and unnecessary). */
+       if (amt_wanted > p->procinfo->max_vcores) {
+               printk("[kernel] proc %d wanted more than max, wanted %d\n", p->pid,
+                      amt_wanted);
+               p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = 1;
+               amt_wanted = 1;
+       }
+       /* There are a few cases where amt_wanted is 0, but they are still RUNNABLE
+        * (involving yields, events, and preemptions).  In these cases, give them
+        * at least 1, so they can make progress and yield properly.  If they are
+        * not WAITING, they did not yield and may have missed a message. */
+       if (!amt_wanted) {
+               /* could ++, but there could be a race and we don't want to give them
+                * more than they ever asked for (in case they haven't prepped) */
+               p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = 1;
+               amt_wanted = 1;
+       }
+       /* amt_granted is racy - they could be *yielding*, but currently they can't
+        * be getting any new cores if the caller is in the mcp_ksched.  this is
+        * okay - we won't accidentally give them more cores than they *ever* wanted
+        * (which could crash them), but our answer might be a little stale. */
+       amt_granted = p->procinfo->res_grant[RES_CORES];
+       /* Do not do an assert like this: it could fail (yield in progress): */
+       //assert(amt_granted == p->procinfo->num_vcores);
+       if (amt_wanted <= amt_granted)
+               return 0;
+       return amt_wanted - amt_granted;
+}
+
+/* Actual work of the MCP kscheduler.  if we were called by poke_ksched, *arg
+ * might be the process who wanted special service.  this would be the case if
+ * we weren't already running the ksched.  Sort of a ghetto way to "post work",
+ * such that it's an optimization. */
+static void __run_mcp_ksched(void *arg)
 {
        struct proc *p, *temp;
+       uint32_t amt_needed;
+       struct proc_list *temp_mcp_list;
+       /* locking to protect the MCP lists' integrity and membership */
        spin_lock(&sched_lock);
-       /* trivially try to handle the needs of all our MCPS.  smarter schedulers
-        * would do something other than FCFS */
-       TAILQ_FOREACH_SAFE(p, &all_mcps, proc_link, temp) {
-               printd("Ksched has MCP %08p (%d)\n", p, p->pid);
-               /* If they are dying, abort.  There's a bit of a race here.  If they
-                * start dying right after the check, core_request/give_cores would
-                * start dealing with a DYING proc.  The code can handle it, but this
-                * will probably change. */
-               if (p->state == PROC_DYING) {
-                       TAILQ_REMOVE(&all_mcps, p, proc_link);
-                       proc_decref(p);
-                       continue;
-               }
-               if (!num_idlecores)
+       /* 2-pass scheme: check each proc on the primary list (FCFS).  if they need
+        * nothing, put them on the secondary list.  if they need something, rip
+        * them off the list, service them, and if they are still not dying, put
+        * them on the secondary list.  We cull the entire primary list, so that
+        * when we start from the beginning each time, we aren't repeatedly checking
+        * procs we looked at on previous waves.
+        *
+        * TODO: we could modify this such that procs that we failed to service move
+        * to yet another list or something.  We can also move the WAITINGs to
+        * another list and have wakeup move them back, etc. */
+       while (!TAILQ_EMPTY(primary_mcps)) {
+               TAILQ_FOREACH_SAFE(p, primary_mcps, ksched_data.proc_link, temp) {
+                       if (p->state == PROC_WAITING) { /* unlocked peek at the state */
+                               switch_lists(p, primary_mcps, secondary_mcps);
+                               continue;
+                       }
+                       amt_needed = get_cores_needed(p);
+                       if (!amt_needed) {
+                               switch_lists(p, primary_mcps, secondary_mcps);
+                               continue;
+                       }
+                       /* o/w, we want to give cores to this proc */
+                       remove_from_list(p, primary_mcps);
+                       /* now it won't die, but it could get removed from lists and have
+                        * its stuff unprov'd when we unlock */
+                       proc_incref(p, 1);
+                       /* GIANT WARNING: __core_req will unlock the sched lock for a bit.
+                        * It will return with it locked still.  We could unlock before we
+                        * pass in, but they will relock right away. */
+                       // notionally_unlock(&ksched_lock);     /* for mouse-eyed viewers */
+                       __core_request(p, amt_needed);
+                       // notionally_lock(&ksched_lock);
+                       /* Peeking at the state is okay, since we hold a ref.  Once it is
+                        * DYING, it'll remain DYING until we decref.  And if there is a
+                        * concurrent death, that will spin on the ksched lock (which we
+                        * hold, and which protects the proc lists). */
+                       if (!proc_is_dying(p))
+                               add_to_list(p, secondary_mcps);
+                       proc_decref(p);                 /* fyi, this may trigger __proc_free */
+                       /* need to break: the proc lists may have changed when we unlocked
+                        * in core_req in ways that the FOREACH_SAFE can't handle. */
                        break;
-               /* TODO: might use amt_wanted as a proxy.  right now, they have
-                * amt_wanted == 1, even though they are waiting.
-                * TODO: this is RACY too - just like with DYING. */
-               if (p->state == PROC_WAITING)
-                       continue;
-               __core_request(p);
+               }
        }
-       if (management_core())
-               __schedule_scp();
+       /* at this point, we moved all the procs over to the secondary list, and
+        * attempted to service the ones that wanted something.  now just swap the
+        * lists for the next invocation of the ksched. */
+       temp_mcp_list = primary_mcps;
+       primary_mcps = secondary_mcps;
+       secondary_mcps = temp_mcp_list;
        spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
 }
 
-/* A process is asking the ksched to look at its resource desires.  The
- * scheduler is free to ignore this, for its own reasons, so long as it
- * eventually gets around to looking at resource desires. */
-void poke_ksched(struct proc *p, int res_type)
+/* Something has changed, and for whatever reason the scheduler should
+ * reevaluate things.
+ *
+ * Don't call this if you are processing a syscall or otherwise care about your
+ * kthread variables, cur_proc/owning_proc, etc.
+ *
+ * Don't call this from interrupt context (grabs proclocks). */
+void run_scheduler(void)
 {
-       /* TODO: probably want something to trigger all res_types */
-       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
-       switch (res_type) {
-               case RES_CORES:
-                       /* ignore core requests from non-mcps (note we have races if we ever
-                        * allow procs to switch back). */
-                       if (!__proc_is_mcp(p))
-                               break;
-                       __core_request(p);
-                       break;
-               default:
-                       break;
+       /* MCP scheduling: post work, then poke.  for now, i just want the func to
+        * run again, so merely a poke is sufficient. */
+       poke(&ksched_poker, 0);
+       if (management_core()) {
+               spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+               __schedule_scp();
+               spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
        }
-       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
 }
 
-/* Proc p just woke up (due to an event).  Our dumb ksched will just try to deal
- * with its core desires. 
- * TODO: this may get called multiple times per unblock */
-void ksched_proc_unblocked(struct proc *p)
+/* A process is asking the ksched to look at its resource desires.  The
+ * scheduler is free to ignore this, for its own reasons, so long as it
+ * eventually gets around to looking at resource desires. */
+void poke_ksched(struct proc *p, unsigned int res_type)
 {
-       /* TODO: this now gets called when an _S unblocks.  schedule_scp() also gets
-        * called, so the process is on the _S runqueue.  Might merge the two in the
-        * future. */
-       poke_ksched(p, RES_CORES);
+       /* ignoring res_type for now.  could post that if we wanted (would need some
+        * other structs/flags) */
+       if (!__proc_is_mcp(p))
+               return;
+       poke(&ksched_poker, p);
 }
 
 /* The calling cpu/core has nothing to do and plans to idle/halt.  This is an
@@ -320,35 +483,6 @@ void cpu_bored(void)
         * the 'call of the giraffe' suffices. */
 }
 
-/* Helper function to return a core to the idlemap.  It causes some more lock
- * acquisitions (like in a for loop), but it's a little easier.  Plus, one day
- * we might be able to do this without locks (for the putting).
- *
- * This is a trigger, telling us we have more cores.  We could/should make a
- * scheduling decision (or at least plan to). */
-void put_idle_core(uint32_t coreid)
-{
-       spin_lock(&idle_lock);
-       idlecoremap[num_idlecores++] = coreid;
-       spin_unlock(&idle_lock);
-}
-
-/* Helper for put_idle and core_req. */
-static void __put_idle_cores(uint32_t *pc_arr, uint32_t num)
-{
-       spin_lock(&idle_lock);
-       for (int i = 0; i < num; i++)
-               idlecoremap[num_idlecores++] = pc_arr[i];
-       spin_unlock(&idle_lock);
-}
-
-/* Bulk interface for put_idle */
-void put_idle_cores(uint32_t *pc_arr, uint32_t num)
-{
-       /* could trigger a sched decision here */
-       __put_idle_cores(pc_arr, num);
-}
-
 /* Available resources changed (plus or minus).  Some parts of the kernel may
  * call this if a particular resource that is 'quantity-based' changes.  Things
  * like available RAM to processes, bandwidth, etc.  Cores would probably be
@@ -358,60 +492,113 @@ void avail_res_changed(int res_type, long change)
        printk("[kernel] ksched doesn't track any resources yet!\n");
 }
 
-/* Normally it'll be the max number of CG cores ever */
-uint32_t max_vcores(struct proc *p)
-{
-#ifdef __CONFIG_DISABLE_SMT__
-       return num_cpus >> 1;
-#else
-       return MAX(1, num_cpus - num_mgmtcores);
-#endif /* __CONFIG_DISABLE_SMT__ */
-}
-
-/* Ghetto helper, just hands out up to 'amt_new' cores (no sense of locality or
- * anything) */
-static uint32_t get_idle_cores(struct proc *p, uint32_t *pc_arr,
-                               uint32_t amt_new)
-{
-       uint32_t num_granted = 0;
-       spin_lock(&idle_lock);
-       for (int i = 0; i < num_idlecores && i < amt_new; i++) {
-               /* grab the last one on the list */
-               pc_arr[i] = idlecoremap[num_idlecores - 1];
-               num_idlecores--;
-               num_granted++;
-       }
-       spin_unlock(&idle_lock);
-       return num_granted;
-}
-
-/* This deals with a request for more cores.  The request is already stored in
- * the proc's amt_wanted (it is compared to amt_granted). */
-static void __core_request(struct proc *p)
+/* This deals with a request for more cores.  The amt of new cores needed is
+ * passed in.  The ksched lock is held, but we are free to unlock if we want
+ * (and we must, if calling out of the ksched to anything high-level).
+ *
+ * Side note: if we want to warn, then we can't deal with this proc's prov'd
+ * cores until we wait til the alarm goes off.  would need to put all
+ * alarmed cores on a list and wait til the alarm goes off to do the full
+ * preempt.  and when those cores come in voluntarily, we'd need to know to
+ * give them to this proc. */
+static void __core_request(struct proc *p, uint32_t amt_needed)
 {
-       uint32_t num_granted, amt_wanted, amt_granted;
-       uint32_t corelist[num_cpus];
-
-       /* TODO: consider copy-in for amt_wanted too. */
-       amt_wanted = p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted;
-       amt_granted = p->procinfo->res_grant[RES_CORES];
-
-       /* Help them out - if they ask for something impossible, give them 1 so they
-        * can make some progress. (this is racy). */
-       if (amt_wanted > p->procinfo->max_vcores) {
-               p->procdata->res_req[RES_CORES].amt_wanted = 1;
+       uint32_t nr_to_grant = 0;
+       uint32_t corelist[num_cores];
+       uint32_t pcoreid;
+       struct proc *proc_to_preempt;
+       bool success;
+       /* we come in holding the ksched lock, and we hold it here to protect
+        * allocations and provisioning. */
+       /* get all available cores from their prov_not_alloc list.  the list might
+        * change when we unlock (new cores added to it, or the entire list emptied,
+        * but no core allocations will happen (we hold the poke)). */
+       while (nr_to_grant != amt_needed) {
+               /* Find the next best core to allocate to p. It may be a core
+                * provisioned to p, and it might not be. */
+               pcoreid = __find_best_core_to_alloc(p);
+               /* If no core is returned, we know that there are no more cores to give
+                * out, so we exit the loop. */
+               if (pcoreid == -1)
+                       break;
+               /* If the pcore chosen currently has a proc allocated to it, we know
+                * it must be provisioned to p, but not allocated to it. We need to try
+                * to preempt. After this block, the core will be track_dealloc'd and
+                * on the idle list (regardless of whether we had to preempt or not) */
+               if (get_alloc_proc(pcoreid)) {
+                       proc_to_preempt = get_alloc_proc(pcoreid);
+                       /* would break both preemption and maybe the later decref */
+                       assert(proc_to_preempt != p);
+                       /* need to keep a valid, external ref when we unlock */
+                       proc_incref(proc_to_preempt, 1);
+                       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+                       /* sending no warning time for now - just an immediate preempt. */
+                       success = proc_preempt_core(proc_to_preempt, pcoreid, 0);
+                       /* reaquire locks to protect provisioning and idle lists */
+                       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+                       if (success) {
+                               /* we preempted it before the proc could yield or die.
+                                * alloc_proc should not have changed (it'll change in death and
+                                * idle CBs).  the core is not on the idle core list.  (if we
+                                * ever have proc alloc lists, it'll still be on the old proc's
+                                * list). */
+                               assert(get_alloc_proc(pcoreid));
+                               /* regardless of whether or not it is still prov to p, we need
+                                * to note its dealloc.  we are doing some excessive checking of
+                                * p == prov_proc, but using this helper is a lot clearer. */
+                               __track_core_dealloc(proc_to_preempt, pcoreid);
+                       } else {
+                               /* the preempt failed, which should only happen if the pcore was
+                                * unmapped (could be dying, could be yielding, but NOT
+                                * preempted).  whoever unmapped it also triggered (or will soon
+                                * trigger) a track_core_dealloc and put it on the idle list.
+                                * Our signal for this is get_alloc_proc() being 0. We need to
+                                * spin and let whoever is trying to free the core grab the
+                                * ksched lock.  We could use an 'ignore_next_idle' flag per
+                                * sched_pcore, but it's not critical anymore.
+                                *
+                                * Note, we're relying on us being the only preemptor - if the
+                                * core was unmapped by *another* preemptor, there would be no
+                                * way of knowing the core was made idle *yet* (the success
+                                * branch in another thread).  likewise, if there were another
+                                * allocator, the pcore could have been put on the idle list and
+                                * then quickly removed/allocated. */
+                               cmb();
+                               while (get_alloc_proc(pcoreid)) {
+                                       /* this loop should be very rare */
+                                       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+                                       udelay(1);
+                                       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+                               }
+                       }
+                       /* no longer need to keep p_to_pre alive */
+                       proc_decref(proc_to_preempt);
+                       /* might not be prov to p anymore (rare race). pcoreid is idle - we
+                        * might get it later, or maybe we'll give it to its rightful proc*/
+                       if (get_prov_proc(pcoreid) != p)
+                               continue;
+               }
+               /* At this point, the pcore is idle, regardless of how we got here
+                * (successful preempt, failed preempt, or it was idle in the first
+                * place).  We also know the core is still provisioned to us.  Lets add
+                * it to the corelist for p (so we can give it to p in bulk later), and
+                * track its allocation with p (so our internal data structures stay in
+                * sync). We rely on the fact that we are the only allocator (pcoreid is
+                * still idle, despite (potentially) unlocking during the preempt
+                * attempt above).  It is guaranteed to be track_dealloc'd()
+                * (regardless of how we got here). */
+               corelist[nr_to_grant] = pcoreid;
+               nr_to_grant++;
+               __track_core_alloc(p, pcoreid);
        }
-       /* if they are satisfied, we're done.  There's a slight chance they have
-        * cores, but they aren't running (sched gave them cores while they were
-        * yielding, and now we see them on the run queue). */
-       if (amt_wanted <= amt_granted)
-               return;
-       /* Otherwise, see what they want, and try to give out as many as possible.
-        * Current models are simple - it's just a raw number of cores, and we just
-        * give out what we can. */
-       num_granted = get_idle_cores(p, corelist, amt_wanted - amt_granted);
        /* Now, actually give them out */
-       if (num_granted) {
+       if (nr_to_grant) {
+               /* Need to unlock before calling out to proc code.  We are somewhat
+                * relying on being the only one allocating 'thread' here, since another
+                * allocator could have seen these cores (if they are prov to some proc)
+                * and could be trying to give them out (and assuming they are already
+                * on the idle list). */
+               spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
                /* give them the cores.  this will start up the extras if RUNNING_M. */
                spin_lock(&p->proc_lock);
                /* if they fail, it is because they are WAITING or DYING.  we could give
@@ -419,39 +606,67 @@ static void __core_request(struct proc *p)
                 * ksched, we'll just put them back on the pile and return.  Note, the
                 * ksched could check the states after locking, but it isn't necessary:
                 * just need to check at some point in the ksched loop. */
-               if (__proc_give_cores(p, corelist, num_granted)) {
-                       __put_idle_cores(corelist, num_granted);
+               if (__proc_give_cores(p, corelist, nr_to_grant)) {
+                       spin_unlock(&p->proc_lock);
+                       /* we failed, put the cores and track their dealloc.  lock is
+                        * protecting those structures. */
+                       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+                       __track_core_dealloc_bulk(p, corelist, nr_to_grant);
                } else {
                        /* at some point after giving cores, call proc_run_m() (harmless on
                         * RUNNING_Ms).  You can give small groups of cores, then run them
                         * (which is more efficient than interleaving runs with the gives
                         * for bulk preempted processes). */
                        __proc_run_m(p);
+                       spin_unlock(&p->proc_lock);
+                       /* main mcp_ksched wants this held (it came to __core_req held) */
+                       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
                }
-               spin_unlock(&p->proc_lock);
        }
+       /* note the ksched lock is still held */
+}
+
+/* Provision a core to a process. This function wraps the primary logic
+ * implemented in __provision_core, with a lock, error checking, etc. */
+int provision_core(struct proc *p, uint32_t pcoreid)
+{
+       /* Make sure we aren't asking for something that doesn't exist (bounds check
+        * on the pcore array) */
+       if (!(pcoreid < num_cores)) {
+               set_errno(ENXIO);
+               return -1;
+       }
+       /* Don't allow the provisioning of LL cores */
+       if (is_ll_core(pcoreid)) {
+               set_errno(EBUSY);
+               return -1;
+       }
+       /* Note the sched lock protects the tailqs for all procs in this code.
+        * If we need a finer grained sched lock, this is one place where we could
+        * have a different lock */
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       __provision_core(p, pcoreid);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+       return 0;
 }
 
 /************** Debugging **************/
 void sched_diag(void)
 {
        struct proc *p;
-       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, &runnable_scps, proc_link)
-               printk("_S PID: %d\n", p->pid);
-       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, &all_mcps, proc_link)
-               printk("MCP PID: %d\n", p->pid);
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, &runnable_scps, ksched_data.proc_link)
+               printk("Runnable _S PID: %d\n", p->pid);
+       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, &unrunnable_scps, ksched_data.proc_link)
+               printk("Unrunnable _S PID: %d\n", p->pid);
+       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, primary_mcps, ksched_data.proc_link)
+               printk("Primary MCP PID: %d\n", p->pid);
+       TAILQ_FOREACH(p, secondary_mcps, ksched_data.proc_link)
+               printk("Secondary MCP PID: %d\n", p->pid);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
        return;
 }
 
-void print_idlecoremap(void)
-{
-       spin_lock(&idle_lock);
-       printk("There are %d idle cores.\n", num_idlecores);
-       for (int i = 0; i < num_idlecores; i++)
-               printk("idlecoremap[%d] = %d\n", i, idlecoremap[i]);
-       spin_unlock(&idle_lock);
-}
-
 void print_resources(struct proc *p)
 {
        printk("--------------------\n");
@@ -465,11 +680,25 @@ void print_resources(struct proc *p)
 void print_all_resources(void)
 {
        /* Hash helper */
-       void __print_resources(void *item)
+       void __print_resources(void *item, void *opaque)
        {
                print_resources((struct proc*)item);
        }
        spin_lock(&pid_hash_lock);
-       hash_for_each(pid_hash, __print_resources);
+       hash_for_each(pid_hash, __print_resources, NULL);
        spin_unlock(&pid_hash_lock);
 }
+
+void next_core_to_alloc(uint32_t pcoreid)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       __next_core_to_alloc(pcoreid);
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+}
+
+void sort_idle_cores(void)
+{
+       spin_lock(&sched_lock);
+       __sort_idle_cores();
+       spin_unlock(&sched_lock);
+}