Fixes handle_indirs issue
[akaros.git] / kern / src / event.c
index f835423..6a52780 100644 (file)
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ static void set_vcore_msgable(uint32_t vcoreid)
 static void post_ev_msg(struct proc *p, struct event_mbox *mbox,
                         struct event_msg *msg, int ev_flags)
 {
-       printd("[kernel] Sending event type %d to mbox %08p\n", msg->ev_type, mbox);
+       printd("[kernel] Sending event type %d to mbox %p\n", msg->ev_type, mbox);
        /* Sanity check */
        assert(p);
        /* If they just want a bit (NOMSG), just set the bit */
@@ -251,7 +251,7 @@ ultimate_fallback:
         * empty and the process is simply WAITING (yielded all of its vcores and is
         * waiting on an event).  Time for the ultimate fallback: locking.  Note
         * that when we __alert_vcore(), there is a chance we need to mmap, which
-        * grabs the mm_lock. */
+        * grabs the vmr_lock and pte_lock. */
        spin_lock(&p->proc_lock);
        if (p->state != PROC_WAITING) {
                /* We need to check the online and bulk_preempt lists again, now that we are
@@ -342,8 +342,11 @@ void send_event(struct proc *p, struct event_queue *ev_q, struct event_msg *msg,
 {
        struct proc *old_proc;
        struct event_mbox *ev_mbox = 0;
+       assert(!in_irq_ctx(&per_cpu_info[core_id()]));
        assert(p);
-       printd("[kernel] sending msg to proc %08p, ev_q %08p\n", p, ev_q);
+       if (p->state == PROC_DYING)
+               return;
+       printd("[kernel] sending msg to proc %p, ev_q %p\n", p, ev_q);
        if (!ev_q) {
                warn("[kernel] Null ev_q - kernel code should check before sending!");
                return;
@@ -357,7 +360,7 @@ void send_event(struct proc *p, struct event_queue *ev_q, struct event_msg *msg,
         * kernel PFs on the user's behalf.  For now, we catch common userspace bugs
         * (had this happen a few times). */
        if (!PTE_ADDR(ev_q)) {
-               printk("[kernel] Bad addr %08p for ev_q\n", ev_q);
+               printk("[kernel] Bad addr %p for ev_q\n", ev_q);
                return;
        }
        /* ev_q is a user pointer, so we need to make sure we're in the right