WIP-9ns
[akaros.git] / Documentation / process-internals.txt
index b9ff0e5..2bb5338 100644 (file)
@@ -11,30 +11,32 @@ Contents:
 2. When Do We Really Leave "Process Context"?
 3. Leaving the Kernel Stack
 4. Preemption and Notification Issues
-5. Current_tf
-6. TBD
+5. current_ctx and owning_proc
+6. Locking!
+7. TLB Coherency
+8. Process Management
+9. On the Ordering of Messages
+10. TBD
 
 1. Reference Counting
 ===========================
 1.1 Basics:
 ---------------------------
-Reference counts (proc_refcnt) exist to keep a process alive.  Eventually, this
-will probably turn into a regular "kernel design pattern", like it is in Linux
-(http://lwn.net/Articles/336224/).  The style of reference counting we use for
-processes is similar to a kref:
+Reference counts exist to keep a process alive.  We use krefs for this, similar
+to Linux's kref:
 - Can only incref if the current value is greater than 0, meaning there is
   already a reference to it.  It is a bug to try to incref on something that has
   no references, so always make sure you incref something that you know has a
-  reference.  If you don't know, you need to get it manually (CAREFULLY!) or use
-  pid2proc (which is a careful way of doing this).  If you incref and there are
-  0 references, the kernel will panic.  Fix your bug / don't incref random
-  pointers.
+  reference.  If you don't know, you need to get it from pid2proc (which is a
+  careful way of doing this - pid2proc kref_get_not_zero()s on the reference that is
+  stored inside it).  If you incref and there are 0 references, the kernel will
+  panic.  Fix your bug / don't incref random pointers.
 - Can always decref.
 - When the decref returns 0, perform some operation.  This does some final
   cleanup on the object.
-
-For a process, proc_destroy() decrefs, and other codes using the proc also
-decref.  The last one to decref calls proc_free to do the final cleanup.
+- Process code is trickier since we frequently make references from 'current'
+  (which isn't too bad), but also because we often do not return and need to be
+  careful about the references we passed in to a no-return function.
 
 1.2 Brief History of the Refcnt:
 ---------------------------
@@ -51,14 +53,30 @@ meaning.
 current is a pointer to the proc that is currently loaded/running on any given
 core.  It is stored in the per_cpu_info struct, and set/managed by low-level
 process code.  It is necessary for the kernel to quickly figure out who is
-running on its code, especially when servicing interrupts and traps.  current is
+running on its core, especially when servicing interrupts and traps.  current is
 protected by a refcnt.
 
+current does not say which process owns / will-run on a core.  The per-cpu
+variable 'owning_proc' covers that.  'owning_proc' should be treated like
+'current' (aka, 'cur_proc') when it comes to reference counting.  Like all
+refcnts, you can use it, but you can't consume it without atomically either
+upping the refcnt or passing the reference (clearing the variable storing the
+reference).  Don't pass it to a function that will consume it and not return
+without upping it.
+
 1.4 Reference Counting Rules:
 ---------------------------
 +1 for existing.
 - The fact that the process is supposed to exist is worth +1.  When it is time
-  to die, we decref, and it will eventually be cleaned up.
+  to die, we decref, and it will eventually be cleaned up.  This existence is
+  explicitly kref_put()d in proc_destroy().
+- The hash table is a bit tricky.  We need to kref_get_not_zero() when it is
+  locked, so we know we aren't racing with proc_free freeing the proc and
+  removing it from the list.  After removing it from the hash, we don't need to
+  kref_put it, since it was an internal ref.  The kref (i.e. external) isn't for
+  being on the hash list, it's for existing.  This separation allows us to
+  remove the proc from the hash list in the "release" function.  See kref.txt
+  for more details.
 
 +1 for someone using it or planning to use it.
 - This includes simply having a pointer to the proc, since presumably you will
@@ -71,7 +89,10 @@ protected by a refcnt.
 
 +1 for current.
 - current counts as someone using it (expressing interest in the core), but is
-  also a source of the pointer, so its a bit different.
+  also a source of the pointer, so its a bit different.  Note that all kref's
+  are sources of a pointer.  When we are running on a core that has current
+  loaded, the ref is both for its usage as well as for being the current
+  process.
 - You have a reference from current and can use it without refcnting, but
   anything that needs to eat a reference or store/use it needs an incref first.
   To be clear, your reference is *NOT* edible.  It protects the cr3, guarantees
@@ -80,8 +101,9 @@ protected by a refcnt.
   an IO continuation request), then clearly you must incref, since it's both
   current and stored/used.
 - If you don't know what might be downstream from your function, then incref
-  before passing the reference, and decref when it returns.  Like when handling
-  syscalls, for example.
+  before passing the reference, and decref when it returns.  We used to do this
+  for all syscalls, but now only do it for calls that might not return and
+  expect to receive reference (like proc_yield).
 
 All functions that take a *proc have a refcnt'd reference, though it may not be
 edible (it could be current).  It is the callers responsibility to make sure
@@ -92,14 +114,20 @@ stores or makes a copy of the reference.
 ---------------------------
 Refcnting and especially decreffing gets tricky when there are functions that
 MAY not return.  proc_restartcore() does not return (it pops into userspace).
-proc_run() might not return, if the core it was called on will pop into
+proc_run() used to not return, if the core it was called on would pop into
 userspace (if it was a _S, or if the core is part of the vcoremap for a _M).
+This doesn't happen anymore, since we have cur_ctx in the per-cpu info.
 
 Functions that MAY not return will "eat" your reference *IF* they do not return.
 This means that you must have a reference when you call them (like always), and
 that reference will be consumed / decref'd for you if the function doesn't
 return.  Or something similarly appropriate.
 
+Arguably, for functions that MAY not return, but will always be called with
+current's reference (proc_yield()), we could get away without giving it an
+edible reference, and then never eating the ref.  Yield needs to be reworked
+anyway, so it's not a bit deal yet.
+
 We do this because when the function does not return, you will not have the
 chance to decref (your decref code will never run).  We need the reference when
 going in to keep the object alive (like with any other refcnt).  We can't have
@@ -110,8 +138,9 @@ screw up, and semantically, if the function returns, then we may still have an
 interest in p and should decref later.
 
 The downside is that functions need to determine if they will return or not,
-which can be a pain (a linear time search when running an _M, for instance,
-which can suck if we are trying to use a broadcast/logical IPI).
+which can be a pain (for an out-of-date example: a linear time search when
+running an _M, for instance, which can suck if we are trying to use a
+broadcast/logical IPI).
 
 As the caller, you usually won't know if the function will return or not, so you
 need to provide a consumable reference.  Current doesn't count.  For example,
@@ -121,12 +150,6 @@ proc_run(pid2proc(55)) works, since pid2proc() increfs for you.  But you cannot
 proc_run(current), unless you incref current in advance.  Incidentally,
 proc_running current doesn't make a lot of sense.
 
-As another example, __proc_startcore() will take your reference and store it
-in current.  Since it is used by both the __startcore and the interrupt return
-paths (proc_restartcore() now, formerly called proc_startcore()), we're
-currently going with the model of "caller makes sure there is a ref for
-current".  Check its comments for details.
-
 1.6 Runnable List:
 ---------------------------
 Procs on the runnable list need to have a refcnt (other than the +1 for
@@ -135,43 +158,33 @@ had it implicitly be refcnt'd (the fact that it's on the list is enough, sort of
 as if it was part of the +1 for existing), but that complicates things.  For
 instance, it is a source of a reference (for the scheduler) and you could not
 proc_run() a process from the runnable list without worrying about increfing it
-before hand.  Remember that proc_run() might consume your reference (which
-actually turns into a current reference, which is later destroyed by decref in
-abandon_core()).
+before hand.  This isn't true anymore, but the runnable lists are getting
+overhauled anyway.  We'll see what works nicely.
 
 1.7 Internal Details for Specific Functions:
 ---------------------------
-proc_run(): makes sure enough refcnts are in place for all places that will
-install current.  This also makes it easier on the system (one big incref(n),
-instead of n increfs of (1) from multiple cores).  In the off chance current was
-already set for a core receiving the kernel message, __startcore will decref.
-Also note that while proc_run() consumes your reference, it's not actually
-decreffing, so there's no danger within proc_run() of the process dying /
-__proc_free()ing.
-
-__proc_startcore(): assumes all references to p are sorted.  *p is already
-accounted for as if it was current on the core startcore runs on. (there is only
-one refcnt for both *p and current, not 2 separate ones).
-
-proc_destroy(): it might not return (if the calling core belongs to the
-process), so it may eat your reference and you must have an edible reference.
-It is possible you called proc_destroy(current).  The cleanup of the current
-will be its own decref, so you need to have a usable/real reference (current
-doesn't count as an edible reference).  So incref before doing that.  Even if p
-== current, proc_destroy() can't tell if you sent it p (and had a reference) or
-current and didn't.
-
-proc_yield(): this never returns, so it eats your reference.  It will also
-decref when it abandon_core()s.
-
-__proc_give_cores() and friends: you call this while holding the lock, but it is
-possible that your core is in the corelist you gave it.  In this case, it will
-detect it, and return a bool signalling if an IPI is pending.  It will not
-consume your reference.  The reasoning behind this is that it is an internal
-function, and you may want to do other things before decreffing.  There is also
-a helper function that will unlock and possibly decref/wait for the IPI, called
-__proc_unlock_ipi_pending().  Use this when it is time to unlock.  It's just a
-helper, which may go away.
+proc_run()/__proc_give_cores(): makes sure enough refcnts are in place for all
+places that will install owning_proc.  This also makes it easier on the system
+(one big incref(n), instead of n increfs of (1) from multiple cores). 
+
+__set_proc_current() is a helper that makes sure p is the cur_proc.  It will
+incref if installing a new reference to p.  If it removed an old proc, it will
+decref.
+
+__proc_startcore(): assumes all references to p are sorted.  It will not
+return, and you should not pass it a reference you need to decref().  Passing
+it 'owning_proc' works, since you don't want to decref owning_proc.
+
+proc_destroy(): it used to not return, and back then if your reference was
+from 'current', you needed to incref.  Now that proc_destroy() returns, it
+isn't a big deal.  Just keep in mind that if you have a function that doesn't
+return, there's no way for the function to know if it's passed reference is
+edible.  Even if p == current, proc_destroy() can't tell if you sent it p (and
+had a reference) or current and didn't.
+
+proc_yield(): when this doesn't return, it eats your reference.  It will also
+decref twice.  Once when it clears_owning_proc, and again when it calls
+abandon_core() (which clears cur_proc).
 
 abandon_core(): it was not given a reference, so it doesn't eat one.  It will
 decref when it unloads the cr3.  Note that this is a potential performance
@@ -181,63 +194,41 @@ cores, after it knows all cores unloaded the cr3.  This would be a good use of
 the checklist (possibly with one cacheline per core).  It would take a large
 amount of memory for better scalability.
 
-1.8 Core Request:
----------------------------
-core_request() is run outside of the process code (for now), though it is fairly
-intricate.  It's another function that might not return, but the reasons for
-this vary:
-       1: The process is moving from _S to _M so the return path to userspace won't
-       happen (and sort of will on the new core / the other side), but that will
-       happen when popping into userspace.
-       2: The scheduler is giving the current core to the process, which can kick
-       in via either proc_run() or __proc_give_cores().
-       3: It was a request to give up all cores, which means the current core will
-       receive an IPI (if it wasn't an async call, which isn't handled yet).
-
-For these reasons, core_request() needs to have an edible reference.
-
-Also, since core_request calls functions that might not return, there are cases
-where it will not be able to call abandon_core() and leave process context.
-This is an example of why we have the fallback case of leaving process context
-in proc_startcore().  See the section below about process context for more
-information.
-
-Eventually, core_request() will be split better, probably with the brutal logic
-in process.c that would call out some functions in resource.c that actually make
-choices.
-
-1.9 Things I Could Have Done But Didn't And Why:
+1.8 Things I Could Have Done But Didn't And Why:
 ---------------------------
 Q: Could we have the first reference (existence) mean it could be on the runnable
 list or otherwise in the proc system (but not other subsystems)?  In this case,
 proc_run() won't need to eat a reference at all - it will just incref for every
 current it will set up.
 
-A: No: if you pid2proc(), then proc_run() but never return, you have (and lose)
-an extra reference.  We need proc_run() to eat the reference when it does not
-return.  If you decref between pid2proc() and proc_run(), there's a (rare) race
-where the refcnt hits 0 by someone else trying to kill it.  While proc_run()
-will check to see if someone else is trying to kill it, there's a slight chance
-that the struct will be reused and recreated.  It'll probably never happen, but
-it could, and out of principle we shouldn't be referencing memory after it's
-been deallocated.  Avoiding races like this is one of the reasons for our refcnt
-discipline.
+New A: Maybe, now that proc_run() returns.
+
+Old A: No: if you pid2proc(), then proc_run() but never return, you have (and
+lose) an extra reference.  We need proc_run() to eat the reference when it
+does not return.  If you decref between pid2proc() and proc_run(), there's a
+(rare) race where the refcnt hits 0 by someone else trying to kill it.  While
+proc_run() will check to see if someone else is trying to kill it, there's a
+slight chance that the struct will be reused and recreated.  It'll probably
+never happen, but it could, and out of principle we shouldn't be referencing
+memory after it's been deallocated.  Avoiding races like this is one of the
+reasons for our refcnt discipline.
 
-Q: Could proc_run() always eat your reference, which would make it easier for
-its implementation?
+Q: (Moot) Could proc_run() always eat your reference, which would make it
+easier for its implementation?
 
 A: Yeah, technically, but it'd be a pain, as mentioned above.  You'd need to
 reaquire a reference via pid2proc, and is rather easy to mess up.
 
-Q: Could we have made proc_destroy() take a flag, saying whether or not it was
-called on current and needed a decref instead of wasting an incref?
+Q: (Moot) Could we have made proc_destroy() take a flag, saying whether or not
+it was called on current and needed a decref instead of wasting an incref?
 
 A: We could, but won't.  This is one case where the external caller is the one
 that knows the function needs to decref or not.  But it breaks the convention a
 bit, doesn't mirror proc_create() as well, and we need to pull in the cacheline
 with the refcnt anyways.  So for now, no.
 
-Q: Could we make __proc_give_cores() simply not return if an IPI is coming?
+Q: (Moot) Could we make __proc_give_cores() simply not return if an IPI is
+coming?
 
 A: I did this originally, and manually unlocked and __wait_for_ipi()d.  Though
 we'd then need to deal with it like that for all of the related functions, which
@@ -274,24 +265,40 @@ it to proc B.
 If no process is running there, current == 0 and boot_cr3 is loaded, meaning no
 process's context is loaded.
 
+All changes to cur_proc, owning_proc, and cur_ctx need to be done with
+interrupts disabled, since they change in interrupt handlers.
+
 2.2 Here's how it is done now:
 ---------------------------
-We try to proactively leave, but have the ability to stay in context til
-__proc_startcore() to handle the corner cases (and to maybe cut down the TLB
-flushes later).  To stop proactively leaving, just change abandon_core() to not
-do anything with current/cr3.  You'll see weird things like processes that won't
-die until their old cores are reused.  The reason we proactively leave context
-is to help with sanity for these issues, and also to avoid decref's in
-__startcore().
+All code is capable of 'spamming' cur_proc (with interrupts disabled!).  If it
+is 0, feel free to set it to whatever process you want.  All code that
+requires current to be set will do so (like __proc_startcore()).  The
+smp_idle() path will make sure current is clear when it halts.  So long as you
+don't change other concurrent code's expectations, you're okay.  What I mean
+by that is you don't clear cur_proc while in an interrupt handler.  But if it
+is already 0, __startcore is allowed to set it to it's future proc (which is
+an optimization).  Other code didn't have any expectations of it (it was 0).
+Likewise, kthread code when we sleep_on() doesn't have to keep cur_proc set.
+A kthread is somewhat an isolated block (codewise), and leaving current set
+when it is done is solely to avoid a TLB flush (at the cost of an incref).
+
+In general, we try to proactively leave process context, but have the ability
+to stay in context til __proc_startcore() to handle the corner cases (and to
+maybe cut down the TLB flushes later).  To stop proactively leaving, just
+change abandon_core() to not do anything with current/cr3.  You'll see weird
+things like processes that won't die until their old cores are reused.  The
+reason we proactively leave context is to help with sanity for these issues,
+and also to avoid decref's in __startcore().
 
 A couple other details: __startcore() sorts the extra increfs, and
 __proc_startcore() sorts leaving the old context.  Anytime a __startcore kernel
-message is sent, the sender increfs in advance for the current refcnt.  If that
-was in error, __startcore decrefs.  __proc_startcore(), which the last moment
-before we *must* have the cr3/current issues sorted, does the actual check if
-there was an old process there or not, while it handles the lcr3 (if necessary).
-In general, lcr3's ought to have refcnts near them, or else comments explaining
-why not.
+message is sent, the sender increfs in advance for the owning_proc refcnt.  As
+an optimization, we can also incref to *attempt* to set current.  If current
+was 0, we set it.  If it was already something else, we failed and need to
+decref.  __proc_startcore(), which the last moment before we *must* have the
+cr3/current issues sorted, does the actual check if there was an old process
+there or not, while it handles the lcr3 (if necessary).  In general, lcr3's
+ought to have refcnts near them, or else comments explaining why not.
 
 So we leave process context when told to do so (__death/abandon_core()) or if
 another process is run there.  The _M code is such that a proc will stay on its
@@ -381,12 +388,14 @@ something.
 ----------------
 There are two ways to deal with this.  One (and the better one, I think) is to
 check state, and determine if it should proceed or abort.  This requires that
-all local-fate dependent calls always have enough state, meaning that any
-function that results in sending a directive to a vcore store enough info in
-the proc struct that a local call can determine if it should take action or
-abort.  This might be sufficient.  This works for death already, since you
-aren't supposed to do anything other than die (and restore any invariants
-first, handled in Section 3).  We'll go with this way.
+all local-fate dependent calls always have enough state to do its job.  In the
+past, this meant that any function that results in sending a directive to a
+vcore store enough info in the proc struct that a local call can determine if
+it should take action or abort.  In the past, we used the vcore/pcoremap as a
+way to send info to the receiver about what vcore they are (or should be).
+Now, we store that info in pcpui (for '__startcore', we send it as a
+parameter.  Either way, the general idea is still true: local calls can
+proceed when they are called, and not self-ipi'd to a nebulous later time.
 
 The other way is to send the work (including the checks) in a self-ipi kernel
 message.  This will guarantee that the message is executed after any existing
@@ -405,23 +414,29 @@ for a proc until AFTER the preemption is completed.
 4.2: Preempt-Served Flag
 ----------------
 We want to be able to consider a pcore free once its owning proc has dealt
-with removing it (not necessarily taken from the vcoremap, but at least it is
-a done-deal that the core will go away and the messages are sent).  This
-allows a scheduler-like function to easily take a core and then give it to
-someone else, without waiting for each vcore to respond, saying that the pcore
-is free/idle.
-
-Since we want to keep the pcore in the vcoremap, we need another signal to let
-a process know a message is already on its way.  preempt_pending is a signal
-to userspace that the alarm was set, not that an actual message is on its way
-and that a vcore's fate is sealed.  Since we can't use a pcore's presence in
-the vcoremap to determine that the core should be revoked, we have to check
-the "fate sealed"/preempt-served flag. 
-
-It's a bit of a pain to have this flag, just to resolve this race in the
-kernel, though the local call would have to check the vcoremap anyway,
-incurring a cache miss if we go with using the vcoremap to signal the
-impending message.
+with removing it.  This allows a scheduler-like function to easily take a core
+and then give it to someone else, without waiting for each vcore to respond,
+saying that the pcore is free/idle.
+
+We used to not unmap until we were in '__preempt' or '__death', and we needed
+a flag to tell yield-like calls that a message was already on the way and to
+not rely on the vcoremap.  This is pretty fucked up for a number of reasons,
+so we changed that.  But we still wanted to know when a preempt was in
+progress so that the kernel could avoid giving out the vcore until the preempt
+was complete.
+
+Here's the scenario: we send a '__startcore' to core 3 for VC5->PC3.  Then we
+quickly send a '__preempt' to 3, and then a '__startcore' to core 4 (a
+different pcore) for VC5->PC4.  Imagine all of this happens before the first
+'__startcore' gets processed (IRQ delay, fast ksched, whatever).  We need to
+not run the second '__startcore' on pcore 4 before the preemption has saved
+all of the state of the VC5.  So we spin on preempt_served (which may get
+renamed to preempt_in_progress).  We need to do this in the sender, and not
+the receiver (not in the kmsg), because the kmsgs can't tell which one they
+are.  Specifically, the first '__startcore' on core 3 runs the same code as
+the '__startcore' on core 4, working on the same vcore.  Anything we tell VC5
+will be seen by both PC3 and PC4.  We'd end up deadlocking on PC3 while it
+spins waiting for the preempt message that also needs to run on PC3.
 
 The preempt_pending flag is actual a timestamp, with the expiration time of
 the core at which the message will be sent.  We could try to use that, but
@@ -492,7 +507,7 @@ assumptions about the vcore->pcore mapping and can result in multiple
 instances of the same vcore on different pcores.  Imagine a preempt message
 sent to a pcore (after the alarm goes off), meanwhile that vcore/pcore yields
 and the vcore reactivates somewhere else.  There is a potential race on the
-preempt_tf state: the new vcore is reading while the old is writing.  This
+vcore_ctx state: the new vcore is reading while the old is writing.  This
 issue is sorted naturally: the vcore entry in the vcoremap isn't cleared until
 the vcore/pcore is actually yielded/taken away, so the code looking for a free
 vcoreid slot will not try to use it.
@@ -531,18 +546,19 @@ process is not running.  Ultimately, the process wants to be notified on a
 given vcore.  Whenever we send an active notification, we set a flag in procdata
 (notif_pending).  If the vcore is offline, we don't bother sending the IPI/notif
 message.  The kernel will make sure it runs the notification handler (as well as
-restoring the preempt_tf) the next time that vcore is restarted.  Note that
+restoring the vcore_ctx) the next time that vcore is restarted.  Note that
 userspace can toggle this, so they can handle the notifications from a different
 core if it likes, or they can independently send a notification.
 
 Note we use notif_pending to detect if an IPI was missed while notifs were
-disabled (this is done in pop_ros_tf() by userspace).  The overall meaning of
-notif_pending is that a vcore wants to be IPI'd.  The IPI could be in-flight, or
-it could be missed.  Since notification IPIs can be spurious, when we have
-potential races, we err on the side of sending.  This happens when pop_ros_tf()
-notifies itself, and when the kernel starts a vcore in it's notif handler if it
-was preempted and notif was pending.  In the latter case, the kernel will put
-the preempt_tf in the notif_tf, so userspace can restart that at its leisure.
+disabled (this is done in pop_user_ctx() by userspace).  The overall meaning
+of notif_pending is that a vcore wants to be IPI'd.  The IPI could be
+in-flight, or it could be missed.  Since notification IPIs can be spurious,
+when we have potential races, we err on the side of sending.  This happens
+when pop_user_ctx() notifies itself, and when the kernel makes sure to start a
+vcore in vcore context if a notif was pending.  This was simplified a bit over
+the years by having uthreads always get saved into the uthread_ctx (formerly
+the notif_tf), instead of in the old preempt_tf (which is now the vcore_ctx).
 
 If a vcore has a preempt_pending, we will still send the active notification
 (IPI).  The core ought to get a notification for the preemption anyway, so we
@@ -561,7 +577,7 @@ do is execute the notification handler and jump to userspace.  Since there is
 still an k_msg in the queue (and we self_ipi'd ourselves, it's part of how
 k_msgs work), the IPI will fire and push us right back into the kernel to
 execute the preemption, and the notif handler's context will be saved in the
-preempt_tf (ready to go when the vcore gets started again).
+vcore_ctx (ready to go when the vcore gets started again).
 
 We could try to just leave the notif_pending flag set and ignore the message,
 but that would involve inspecting the queue for the preempt k_msg.
@@ -579,14 +595,13 @@ flexibility in schedule()-like functions (no need to wait to give the core
 out), quicker dispatch latencies, less contention on shared structs (like the
 idle-core-map), etc.
 
-Also, we don't remove the pcore from the vcoremap, even if it is being
-allocated to another core (the same pcore can exist in two vcoremaps, contrary
-to older statements).  Taking the pcore from the vcoremap would mean some
-non-fate related local calls (sys_get_vcoreid()) will fail, since the vcoreid
-is gone!  Additionally, we don't need a vcoreid in the k_msg (we would have if
-we could not use the vcore/pcoremappings).  There should not be any issues
-with the new process sending messages to the pcore before the core is sorted,
-since k_msgs are delivered in order.
+This 'freeing' of the pcore is from the perspective of the kernel scheduler
+and the proc struct.  Contrary to all previous announcements, vcores are
+unmapped from pcores when sending k_msgs (technically right after), while
+holding the lock.  The pcore isn't actually not-running-the-proc until the
+kmsg completes and we abandon_core().  Previously, we used the vcoremap to
+communicate to other cores in a lock-free manner, but that was pretty shitty
+and now we just store the vcoreid in pcpu info.
 
 Another tricky part is the seq_ctr used to signal userspace of changes to the
 coremap or num_vcores (coremap_seqctr).  While we may not even need this in the
@@ -612,13 +627,24 @@ future, we would like to have broadcast messaging of some sort (literally a
 broadcast, like the IPIs, and if not that, then a communication tree of
 sorts).  
 
-Given those desires, we want to make sure that no message we send needs
-details specific to a pcore (such as the vcoreid running on it, a history
-number, or anything like that).  Thus no k_msg related to process management
-should have anything that cannot apply to the entire process.  At this point,
-most just have a struct proc *.  A pcore ought to be able to figure out what
-is happening based on the pcoremap, information in the struct proc, and in the
-preempt struct in procdata.
+In the past, (OLD INFO): given those desires, we wanted to make sure that no
+message we send needs details specific to a pcore (such as the vcoreid running
+on it, a history number, or anything like that).  Thus no k_msg related to
+process management would have anything that cannot apply to the entire
+process.  At this point, most just have a struct proc *.  A pcore was be able
+to figure out what is happening based on the pcoremap, information in the
+struct proc, and in the preempt struct in procdata.
+
+In more recent revisions, the coremap no longer is meant to be used across
+kmsgs, so some messages ('__startcore') send the vcoreid.  This means we can't
+easily broadcast the message.  However, many broadcast mechanisms wouldn't
+handle '__startcore' naturally.  For instance, logical IPIs need something
+already set in the LAPIC, or maybe need to be sent to a somewhat predetermined
+group (again, bits in the LAPIC).  If we tried this for '__startcore', we
+could add something in to the messaging to carry these vcoreids.  More likely,
+we'll have a broadcast tree.  Keeping vcoreid (or any arg) next to whoever
+needs to receive the message is a very small amount of bookkeeping on a struct
+that already does bookkeeping.
 
 4.10: Other Things We Thought of but Don't Like
 ---------------------------
@@ -660,28 +686,716 @@ We also considered using the transition stack as a signal that a process is in
 a notification handler.  The kernel can inspect the stack pointer to determine
 this.  It's possible, but unnecessary.
 
-5. current_tf
+Using the pcoremap as a way to pass info with kmsgs: it worked a little, but
+had some serious problems, as well as making life difficult.  It had two
+purposes: help with local fate calls (yield) and allow broadcast messaging.
+The main issue is that it was using a global struct to pass info with
+messages, but it was based on the snapshot of state at the time the message
+was sent.  When you send a bunch of messages, certain state may have changed
+between messages, and the old snapshot isn't there anymore by the time the
+message gets there.  To avoid this, we went through some hoops and had some
+fragile code that would use other signals to avoid those scenarios where the
+global state change would send the wrong message.  It was tough to understand,
+and not clear it was correct (hint: it wasn't).  Here's an example (on one
+pcore): if we send a preempt and we then try to map that pcore to another
+vcore in the same process before the preempt call checks its pcoremap, we'll
+clobber the pcore->vcore mapping (used by startcore) and the preempt will
+think it is the new vcore, not the one it was when the message was sent.
+While this is a bit convoluted, I can imagine a ksched doing this, and
+perhaps with weird IRQ delays, the messages might get delayed enough for it to
+happen.  I'd rather not have to have the ksched worry about this just because
+proc code was old and ghetto.  Another reason we changed all of this was so
+that you could trust the vcoremap while holding the lock.  Otherwise, it's
+actually non-trivial to know the state of a vcore (need to check a combination
+of preempt_served and is_mapped), and even if you do that, there are some
+complications with doing this in the ksched.
+
+5. current_ctx and owning_proc
+===========================
+Originally, current_tf was a per-core macro that returns a struct trapframe *
+that points back on the kernel stack to the user context that was running on
+the given core when an interrupt or trap happened.  Saving the reference to
+the TF helps simplify code that needs to do something with the TF (like save
+it and pop another TF).  This way, we don't need to pass the context all over
+the place, especially through code that might not care.
+
+Then, current_tf was more broadly defined as the user context that should be
+run when the kernel is ready to run a process.  In the older case, it was when
+the kernel tries to return to userspace from a trap/interrupt.  current_tf
+could be set by an IPI/KMSG (like '__startcore') so that when the kernel wants
+to idle, it will find a current_tf that it needs to run, even though we never
+trapped in on that context in the first place.
+
+Finally, current_tf was changed to current_ctx, and instead of tracking a
+struct trapframe (equivalent to a hw_trapframe), it now tracked a struct
+user_context, which could be either a HW or a SW trapframe.
+
+Further, we now have 'owning_proc', which tells the kernel which process
+should be run.  'owning_proc' is a bigger deal than 'current_ctx', and it is
+what tells us to run cur_ctx.
+
+Process management KMSGs now simply modify 'owning_proc' and cur_ctx, as if we
+had interrupted a process.  Instead of '__startcore' forcing the kernel to
+actually run the process and trapframe, it will just mean we will eventually
+run it.  In the meantime a '__notify' or a '__preempt' can come in, and they
+will apply to the owning_proc/cur_ctx.  This greatly simplifies process code
+and code calling process code (like the scheduler), since we no longer need to
+worry about whether or not we are getting a "stack killing" kernel message.
+Before this, code needed to care where it was running when managing _Ms.
+
+Note that neither 'current_ctx' nor 'owning_proc' rely on 'current'/'cur_proc'.
+'current' is just what process context we're in, not what process (and which
+trapframe) we will eventually run.
+
+cur_ctx does not point to kernel trapframes, which is important when we
+receive an interrupt in the kernel.  At one point, we were (hypothetically)
+clobbering the reference to the user trapframe, and were unable to recover.
+We can get away with this because the kernel always returns to its previous
+context from a nested handler (via iret on x86).  
+
+In the future, we may need to save kernel contexts and may not always return
+via iret.  At which point, if the code path is deep enough that we don't want
+to carry the TF pointer, we may revisit this.  Until then, current_ctx is just
+for userspace contexts, and is simply stored in per_cpu_info.
+
+Brief note from the future (months after this paragraph was written): cur_ctx
+has two aspects/jobs:
+1) tell the kernel what we should do (trap, fault, sysc, etc), how we came
+into the kernel (the fact that it is a user tf), which is why we copy-out
+early on
+2) be a vehicle for us to restart the process/vcore
+
+We've been focusing on the latter case a lot, since that is what gets
+removed when preempted, changed during a notify, created during a startcore,
+etc.  Don't forget it was also an instruction of sorts.  The former case is
+always true throughout the life of the syscall.  The latter only happens to be
+true throughout the life of a *non-blocking* trap since preempts are routine
+KMSGs.  But if we block in a syscall, the cur_ctx is no longer the TF we came
+in on (and possibly the one we are asked to operate on), and that old cur_ctx
+has probably restarted.
+
+(Note that cur_ctx is a pointer, and syscalls/traps actually operate on the TF
+they came in on regardless of what happens to cur_ctx or pcpui->actual_tf.)
+
+6. Locking!
+===========================
+6.1: proc_lock
+---------------------------
+Currently, all locking is done on the proc_lock.  It's main goal is to protect
+the vcore mapping (vcore->pcore and vice versa).  As of Apr 2010, it's also used
+to protect changes to the address space and the refcnt.  Eventually the refcnt
+will be handled with atomics, and the address space will have it's own MM lock.  
+
+We grab the proc_lock all over the place, but we try to avoid it whereever
+possible - especially in kernel messages or other places that will be executed
+in parallel.  One place we do grab it but would like to not is in proc_yield().  
+We don't always need to grab the proc lock.  Here are some examples:
+
+6.1.1: Lockless Notifications:
+-------------
+We don't lock when sending a notification.  We want the proc_lock to not be an
+irqsave lock (discussed below).  Since we might want to send a notification from
+interrupt context, we can't grab the proc_lock if it's a regular lock.  
+
+This is okay, since the proc_lock is only protecting the vcoremapping.  We could
+accidentally send the notification to the wrong pcore.  The __notif handler
+checks to make sure it is the right process, and all _M processes should be able
+to handle spurious notifications.  This assumes they are still _M.
+
+If we send it to the wrong pcore, there is a danger of losing the notif, since
+it didn't go to the correct vcore.  That would happen anyway, (the vcore is
+unmapped, or in the process of mapping).  The notif_pending flag will be caught
+when the vcore is started up next time (and that flag was set before reading the
+vcoremap).
+
+6.1.2: Local get_vcoreid():
+-------------
+It's not necessary to lock while checking the vcoremap if you are checking for
+the core you are running on (e.g. pcoreid == core_id()).  This is because all
+unmappings of a vcore are done on the receive side of a routine kmsg, and that
+code cannot run concurrently with the code you are running.  
+
+6.2: irqsave
+---------------------------
+The proc_lock used to be an irqsave lock (meaning it disables interrupts and can
+be grabbed from interrupt context).  We made it a regular lock for a couple
+reasons.  The immediate one was it was causing deadlocks due to some other
+ghetto things (blocking on the frontend server, for instance).  More generally,
+we don't want to disable interrupts for long periods of time, so it was
+something worth doing anyway.  
+
+This means that we cannot grab the proc_lock from interrupt context.  This
+includes having schedule called from an interrupt handler (like the
+timer_interrupt() handler), since it will call proc_run.  Right now, we actually
+do this, which we shouldn't, and that will eventually get fixed.  The right
+answer is that the actual work of running the scheduler should be a routine
+kmsg, similar to how Linux sets a bit in the kernel that it checks on the way
+out to see if it should run the scheduler or not.
+
+7. TLB Coherency
+===========================
+When changing or removing memory mappings, we need to do some form of a TLB
+shootdown.  Normally, this will require sending an IPI (immediate kmsg) to
+every vcore of a process to unmap the affected page.  Before allocating that
+page back out, we need to make sure that every TLB has been flushed.  
+
+One reason to use a kmsg over a simple handler is that we often want to pass a
+virtual address to flush for those architectures (like x86) that can
+invalidate a specific page.  Ideally, we'd use a broadcast kmsg (doesn't exist
+yet), though we already have simple broadcast IPIs.
+
+7.1 Initial Stuff
+---------------------------
+One big issue is whether or not to wait for a response from the other vcores
+that they have unmapped.  There are two concerns: 1) Page reuse and 2) User
+semantics.  We cannot give out the physical page while it may still be in a
+TLB (even to the same process.  Ask us about the pthread_test bug).
+
+The second case is a little more detailed.  The application may not like it if
+it thinks a page is unmapped or protected, and it does not generate a fault.
+I am less concerned about this, especially since we know that even if we don't
+wait to hear from every vcore, we know that the message was delivered and the
+IPI sent.  Any cores that are in userspace will have trapped and eventually
+handle the shootdown before having a chance to execute other user code.  The
+delays in the shootdown response are due to being in the kernel with
+interrupts disabled (it was an IMMEDIATE kmsg).
+
+7.2 RCU
+---------------------------
+One approach is similar to RCU.  Unmap the page, but don't put it on the free
+list.  Instead, don't reallocate it until we are sure every core (possibly
+just affected cores) had a chance to run its kmsg handlers.  This time is
+similar to the RCU grace periods.  Once the period is over, we can then truly
+free the page.
+
+This would require some sort of RCU-like mechanism and probably a per-core
+variable that has the timestamp of the last quiescent period.  Code caring
+about when this page (or pages) can be freed would have to check on all of the
+cores (probably in a bitmask for what needs to be freed).  It would make sense
+to amortize this over several RCU-like operations.
+
+7.3 Checklist
+---------------------------
+It might not suck that much to wait for a response if you already sent an IPI,
+though it incurs some more cache misses.  If you wanted to ensure all vcores
+ran the shootdown handler, you'd have them all toggle their bit in a checklist
+(unused for a while, check smp.c).  The only one who waits would be the
+caller, but there still are a bunch of cache misses in the handlers.  Maybe
+this isn't that big of a deal, and the RCU thing is an unnecessary
+optimization.
+
+7.4 Just Wait til a Context Switch
+---------------------------
+Another option is to not bother freeing the page until the entire process is
+descheduled.  This could be a very long time, and also will mess with
+userspace's semantics.  They would be running user code that could still
+access the old page, so in essence this is a lazy munmap/mprotect.  The
+process basically has the page in pergatory: it can't be reallocated, and it
+might be accessible, but can't be guaranteed to work.
+
+The main benefit of this is that you don't need to send the TLB shootdown IPI
+at all - so you don't interfere with the app.  Though in return, they have
+possibly weird semantics.  One aspect of these weird semantics is that the
+same virtual address could map to two different pages - that seems like a
+disaster waiting to happen.  We could also block that range of the virtual
+address space from being reallocated, but that gets even more tricky.
+
+One issue with just waiting and RCU is memory pressure.  If we actually need
+the page, we will need to enforce an unmapping, which sucks a little.
+
+7.5 Bulk vs Single
+---------------------------
+If there are a lot of pages being shot down, it'd be best to amortize the cost
+of the kernel messages, as well as the invlpg calls (single page shootdowns).
+One option would be for the kmsg to take a range, and not just a single
+address.  This would help with bulk munmap/mprotects.  Based on the number of
+these, perhaps a raw tlbflush (the entire TLB) would be worth while, instead
+of n single shots.  Odds are, that number is arch and possibly workload
+specific.
+
+For now, the plan will be to send a range and have them individually shot
+down.
+
+7.6 Don't do it
+---------------------------
+Either way, munmap/mprotect sucks in an MCP.  I recommend not doing it, and
+doing the appropriate mmap/munmap/mprotects in _S mode.  Unfortunately, even
+our crap pthread library munmaps on demand as threads are created and
+destroyed.  The vcore code probably does in the bowels of glibc's TLS code
+too, though at least that isn't on every user context switch.
+
+7.7 Local memory
+---------------------------
+Private local memory would help with this too.  If each vcore has its own
+range, we won't need to send TLB shootdowns for those areas, and we won't have
+to worry about weird application semantics.  The downside is we would need to
+do these mmaps in certain ranges in advance, and might not easily be able to
+do them remotely.  More on this when we actually design and build it.
+
+7.8 Future Hardware Support
+---------------------------
+It would be cool and interesting if we had the ability to remotely shootdown
+TLBs.  For instance, all cores with cr3 == X, shootdown range Y..Z.  It's
+basically what we'll do with the kernel message and the vcoremap, but with
+magic hardware.
+
+7.9 Current Status
+---------------------------
+For now, we just send a kernel message to all vcores to do a full TLB flush,
+and not to worry about checklists, waiting, or anything.  This is due to being
+short on time and not wanting to sort out the issue with ranges.  The way
+it'll get changed to is to send the kmsg with the range to the appropriate
+cores, and then maybe put the page on the end of the freelist (instead of the
+head).  More to come.
+
+8. Process Management
 ===========================
-current_tf is a per-core macro that returns a struct trapframe * that points
-back on the kernel stack to the user context that was running on the given core
-when an interrupt or trap happened.  Saving the reference to the TF helps
-simplify code that needs to do something with the TF (like save it and pop
-another TF).  This way, we don't need to pass the context all over the place,
-especially through code that might not care.
-
-current_tf should go along with current.  It's the current_tf of the current
-process.  Withouth 'current', it has no meaning.
-
-It does not point to kernel trapframes, which is important when we receive an
-interrupt in the kernel.  At one point, we were (hypothetically) clobbering the
-reference to the user trapframe, and were unable to recover.  We can get away
-with this because the kernel always returns to its previous context from a
-nested handler (via iret on x86).  
-
-In the future, we may need to save kernel contexts and may not always return via
-iret.  At which point, if the code path is deep enough that we don't want to
-carry the TF pointer, we may revisit this.  Until then, current_tf is just for
-userspace contexts, and is simply stored in per_cpu_info.
-
-6. TBD
+8.1 Vcore lists
+---------------------------
+We have three lists to track a process's vcores.  The vcores themselves sit in
+the vcoremap in procinfo; they aren't dynamically allocated (memory) or
+anything like that.  The lists greatly eases vcore discovery and management.
+
+A vcore is on exactly one of three lists: online (mapped and running vcores,
+sometimes called 'active'), bulk_preempt (was online when the process was bulk
+preempted (like a timeslice)), and inactive (yielded, hasn't come on yet,
+etc).  When writes are complete (unlocked), either the online list or the
+bulk_preempt list should be empty.
+
+List modifications are protected by the proc_lock.  You can concurrently read,
+but note you may get some weird behavior, such as a vcore on multiple lists, a
+vcore on no lists, online and bulk_preempt both having items, etc.  Currently,
+event code will read these lists when hunting for a suitable core, and will
+have to be careful about races.  I want to avoid event FALLBACK code from
+grabbing the proc_lock.
+
+Another slight thing to be careful of is that the vcore lists don't always
+agree with the vcore mapping.  However, it will always agree with what the
+state of the process will be when all kmsgs are processed (fate).
+Specifically, when we take vcores, the unmapping happens with the lock not
+held on the vcore itself (as discussed elsewhere).  The vcore lists represent
+the result of those pending unmaps.
+
+Before we used the lists, we scanned the vcoremap in a painful, clunky manner.
+In the old style, when you asked for a vcore, the first one you got was the
+first hole in the vcoremap.  Ex: Vcore0 would always be granted if it was
+offline.  That's no longer true; the most recent vcore yielded will be given
+out next.  This will help with cache locality, and also cuts down on the
+scenarios on which the kernel gives out a vcore that userspace wasn't
+expecting.  This can still happen if they ask for more vcores than they set up
+for, or if a vcore doesn't *want* to come online (there's a couple scenarios
+with preemption recovery where that may come up).
+
+So the plan with the bulk preempt list is that vcores on it were preempted,
+and the kernel will attempt to restart all of them (and move them to the online
+list).  Any leftovers will be moved to the inactive list, and have preemption
+recovery messages sent out.  Any shortages (they want more vcores than were
+bulk_preempted) will be taken from the yield list.  This all means that
+whether or not a vcore needs to be preempt-recovered or if there is a message
+out about its preemption doesn't really affect which list it is on.  You could
+have a vcore on the inactive list that was bulk preempted (and not turned back
+on), and then that vcore gets granted in the next round of vcore_requests().
+The preemption recovery handlers will need to deal with concurrent handlers
+and the vcore itself starting back up.
+
+9. On the Ordering of Messages and Bugs with Old State
+===========================
+This is a sordid tale involving message ordering, message delivery times, and
+finding out (sometimes too late) that the state you expected is gone and
+having to deal with that error.
+
+A few design issues:
+- being able to send messages and have them execute in the order they are
+  sent
+- having message handlers resolve issues with global state.  Some need to know
+  the correct 'world view', and others need to know what was the state at the
+  time they were sent.
+- realizing syscalls, traps, faults, and any non-IRQ entry into the kernel is
+  really a message.
+
+Process management messages have alternated from ROUTINE to IMMEDIATE and now
+back to ROUTINE.  These messages include such family favorites as
+'__startcore', '__preempt', etc.  Meanwhile, syscalls were coming in that
+needed to know about the core and the process's state (specifically, yield,
+change_to, and get_vcoreid).  Finally, we wanted to avoid locking, esp in
+KMSGs handlers (imagine all cores grabbing the lock to check the vcoremap or
+something).
+
+Incidentally, events were being delivered concurretly to vcores, though that
+actually didn't matter much (check out async_events.txt for more on that).
+
+9.1: Design Guidelines
+---------------------------
+Initially, we wanted to keep broadcast messaging available as an option.  As
+noted elsewhere, we can't really do this well for startcore, since most
+hardware broadcast options need some initial per-core setup, and any sort of
+broadcast tree we make should be able to handle a small message.  Anyway, this
+desire in the early code to keep all messages identical lead to a few
+problems.
+
+Another objective of the kernel messaging was to avoid having the message
+handlers grab any locks, especially the same lock (the proc lock is used to
+protect the vcore map, for instance).
+
+Later on, a few needs popped up that motivated the changes discussed below:
+- Being able to find out which proc/vcore was on a pcore
+- Not having syscalls/traps require crazy logic if the carpet was pulled out
+  from under them.
+- Having proc management calls return.  This one was sorted out by making all
+  kmsg handlers return.  It would be a nightmare making a ksched without this.
+
+9.2: Looking at Old State: a New Bug for an Old Problem
+---------------------------
+We've always had issues with syscalls coming in and already had the fate of a
+core determined.  This is referred to in a few places as "predetermined fate"
+vs "local state".  A remote lock holder (ksched) already determined a core
+should be unmapped and sent a message.  Only later does some call like
+proc_yield() realize its core is already *unmapped*. (I use that term poorly
+here).  This sort of code had to realize it was working on an old version of
+state and just abort.  This was usually safe, though looking at the vcoremap
+was a bad idea.  Initially, we used preempt_served as the signal, which was
+okay.  Around 12b06586 yield started to use the vcoremap, which turned out to
+be wrong.
+
+A similar issue happens for the vcore messages (startcore, preempt, etc).  The
+way startcore used to work was that it would only know what pcore it was on,
+and then look into the vcoremap to figure out what vcoreid it should be
+running.  This was to keep broadcast messaging available as an option.  The
+problem with it is that the vcoremap may have changed between when the
+messages were sent and when they were executed.  Imagine a startcore followed
+by a preempt, afterwhich the vcore was unmapped.  Well, to get around that, we
+had the unmapping happen in the preempt or death handlers.  Yikes!  This was
+the case back in the early days of ROS.  This meant the vcoremap wasn't
+actually representative of the decisions the ksched made - we also needed to
+look at the state we'd have after all outstanding messages executed.  And this
+would differ from the vcore lists (which were correct for a lock holder).
+
+This was managable for a little while, until I tried to conclusively know who
+owned a particular pcore.  This came up while making a provisioning scheduler.
+Given a pcore, tell me which process/vcore (if any) were on it.  It was rather
+tough.  Getting the proc wasn't too hard, but knowing which vcore was a little
+tougher.  (Note the ksched doesn't care about which vcore is running, and the
+process can change vcores on a pcore at will).  But once you start looking at
+the process, you can't tell which vcore a certain pcore has.  The vcoremap may
+be wrong, since a preempt is already on the way.  You would have had to scan
+the vcore lists to see if the proc code thought that vcore was online or not
+(which would mean there had been no preempts).  This is the pain I was talking
+about back around commit 5343a74e0.
+
+So I changed things so that the vcoremap was always correct for lock holders,
+and used pcpui to track owning_vcoreid (for preempt/notify), and used an extra
+KMSG variable to tell startcore which vcoreid it should use.  In doing so, we
+(re)created the issue that the delayed unmapping dealt with: the vcoremap
+would represent *now*, and not the vcoremap of when the messages were first
+sent.  However, this had little to do with the KMSGs, which I was originally
+worried about.  No one was looking at the vcoremap without the lock, so the
+KMSGs were okay, but remember: syscalls are like messages too.  They needed to
+figure out what vcore they were on, i.e. what vcore userspace was making
+requests on (viewing a trap/fault as a type of request).
+
+Now the problem was that we were using the vcoremap to figure out which vcore
+we were supposed to be.  When a syscall finally ran, the vcoremap could be
+completely wrong, and with immediate KMSGs (discussed below), the pcpui was
+already changed!  We dealt with the problem for KMSGs, but not syscalls, and
+basically reintroduced the bug of looking at current state and thinking it
+represented the state from when the 'message' was sent (when we trapped into
+the kernel, for a syscall/exception).
+
+9.3: Message Delivery, Circular Waiting, and Having the Carpet Pulled Out
+---------------------------
+In-order message delivery was what drove me to build the kernel messaging
+system in the first place.  It provides in-order messages to a particular
+pcore.  This was enough for a few scenarios, such as preempts racing ahead of
+startcores, or deaths racing a head of preempts, etc.  However, I also wanted
+an ordering of messages related to a particular vcore, and this wasn't
+apparent early on.
+
+The issue first popped up with a startcore coming quickly on the heals of a
+preempt for the same VC, but on different PCs.  The startcore cannot proceed
+until the preempt saved the TF into the VCPD.  The old way of dealing with
+this was to spin in '__map_vcore()'.  This was problematic, since it meant we
+were spinning while holding a lock, and resulted in some minor bugs and issues
+with lock ordering and IRQ disabling (couldn't disable IRQs and then try to
+grab the lock, since the lock holder could have sent you a message and is
+waiting for you to handle the IRQ/IMMED KMSG).  However, it was doable.  But
+what wasn't doable was to have the KMSGs be ROUTINE.  Any syscalls that tried
+to grab the proc lock (lots of them) would deadlock, since the lock holder was
+waiting on us to handle the preempt (same circular waiting issue as above).
+
+This was fine, albeit subpar, until a new issue showed up.  Sending IMMED
+KMSGs worked fine if we were coming from userspace already, but if we were in
+the kernel, those messages would run immediately (hence the name), just like
+an IRQ handler, and could confuse syscalls that touched cur_ctx/pcpui.  If a
+preempt came in during a syscall, the process/vcore could be changed before
+the syscall took place.  Some syscalls could handle this, albeit poorly.
+sys_proc_yield() and sys_change_vcore() delicately tried to detect if they
+were still mapped or not and use that to determine if a preemption happened.
+
+As mentioned above, looking at the vcoremap only tells you what is currently
+happening, and not what happened in the past.  Specifically, it doesn't tell
+you the state of the mapping when a particular core trapped into the kernel
+for a syscall (referred to as when the 'message' was sent up above).  Imagine
+sys_get_vcoreid(): you trap in, then immediately get preempted, then startcore
+for the same process but a different vcoreid.  The syscall would return with
+the vcoreid of the new vcore, since it cannot tell there was a change.  The
+async syscall would complete and we'd have a wrong answer.  While this never
+happened to me, I had a similar issue while debugging some other bugs (I'd get
+a vcoreid of 0xdeadbeef, for instance, which was the old poison value for an
+unmapped vcoreid).  There are a bunch of other scenarios that trigger similar
+disasters, and they are very hard to avoid.
+
+One way out of this was a per-core history counter, that changed whenever we
+changed cur_ctx.  Then when we trapped in for a syscall, we could save the
+value, enable_irqs(), and go about our business.  Later on, we'd have to
+disable_irqs() and compare the counters.  If they were different, we'd have to
+bail out some how.  This could have worked for change_to and yield, and some
+others.  But any syscall that wanted to operate on cur_ctx in some way would
+fail (imagine a hypothetical sys_change_stack_pointer()).  The context that
+trapped has already returned on another core.  I guess we could just fail that
+syscall, though it seems a little silly to not be able to do that.
+
+The previous example was a bit contrived, but lets also remember that it isn't
+just syscalls: all exceptions have the same issue.  Faults might be fixable,
+since if you restart a faulting context, it will start on the faulting
+instruction.  However all traps (like syscall) restart on the next
+instruction.  Hope we don't want to do anything fancy with breakpoint!  Note
+that I had breakpointing contexts restart on other pcores and continue while I
+was in the breakpoint handler (noticed while I was debugging some bugs with
+lots of preempts).  Yikes.  And don't forget we eventually want to do some
+complicated things with the page fault handler, and may want to turn on
+interrupts / kthread during a page fault (imaging hitting disk).  Yikes.
+
+So I looked into going back to ROUTINE kernel messages.  With ROUTINE
+messages, I didn't have to worry about having the carpet pulled out from under
+syscalls and exceptions (traps, faults, etc).  The 'carpet' is stuff like
+cur_ctx, owning_proc, owning_vcoreid, etc.  We still cannot trust the vcoremap,
+unless we *know* there were no preempts or other KMSGs waiting for us.
+(Incidentally, in the recent fix a93aa7559, we merely use the vcoremap as a
+sanity check).
+
+However, we can't just switch back to ROUTINEs.  Remember: with ROUTINEs,
+we will deadlock in '__map_vcore()', when it waits for the completion of
+preempt.  Ideally, we would have had startcore spin on the signal.  Since we
+already gave up on using x86-style broadcast IPIs for startcore (in
+5343a74e0), we might as well pass along a history counter, so it knows to wait
+on preempt.
+
+9.4: The Solution
+---------------------------
+To fix up all of this, we now detect preemptions in syscalls/traps and order
+our kernel messages with two simple per-vcore counters.  Whenever we send a
+preempt, we up one counter.  Whenever that preempt finishes, it ups another
+counter.  When we send out startcores, we send a copy of the first counter.
+This is a way of telling startcore where it belongs in the list of messages.
+More specifically, it tells it which preempt happens-before it.
+
+Basically, I wanted a partial ordering on my messages, so that messages sent
+to a particular vcore are handled in the order they were sent, even if those
+messages run on different physical cores.
+
+It is not sufficient to use a seq counter (one integer, odd values for
+'preempt in progress' and even values for 'preempt done').  It is possible to
+have multiple preempts in flight for the same vcore, albeit with startcores in
+between.  Still, there's no way to encode that scenario in just one counter.
+
+Here's a normal example of traffic to some vcore.  I note both the sending and
+the execution of the kmsgs:
+   nr_pre_sent    nr_pre_done    pcore     message sent/status
+   -------------------------------------------------------------
+   0              0              X         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 0)
+   0              0              X         startcore (executes)
+   1              0              X         preempt   (kmsg sent)
+   1              1              Y         preempt   (executes)
+   1              1              Y         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 1)
+   1              1              Y         startcore (executes)
+
+Note the messages are always sent by the lockholder in the order of the
+example above.
+
+Here's when the startcore gets ahead of the prior preempt:
+   nr_pre_sent    nr_pre_done    pcore     message sent/status
+   -------------------------------------------------------------
+   0              0              X         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 0) 
+   0              0              X         startcore (executes)
+   1              0              X         preempt   (kmsg sent)
+   1              0              Y         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 1)
+   1              1              X         preempt   (executes)
+   1              1              Y         startcore (executes)
+
+Note that this can only happen across cores, since KMSGs to a particular core
+are handled in order (for a given class of message).  The startcore blocks on
+the prior preempt.
+
+Finally, here's an example of what a seq ctr can't handle:
+   nr_pre_sent    nr_pre_done    pcore     message sent/status
+   -------------------------------------------------------------
+   0              0              X         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 0) 
+   1              0              X         preempt   (kmsg sent)
+   1              0              Y         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 1)
+   2              0              Y         preempt   (kmsg sent)
+   2              0              Z         startcore (nr_pre_sent == 2)
+   2              1              X         preempt   (executes (upped to 1))
+   2              1              Y         startcore (executes (needed 1))
+   2              2              Y         preempt   (executes (upped to 2))
+   2              Z              Z         startcore (executes (needed 2))
+
+As a nice bonus, it is easy for syscalls that care about the vcoreid (yield,
+change_to, get_vcoreid) to check if they have a preempt_served.  Just grab the
+lock (to prevent further messages being sent), then check the counters.  If
+they are equal, there is no preempt on its way.  This actually was the
+original way we checked for preempts in proc_yield back in the day.  It was
+just called preempt_served.  Now, it is split into two counters, instead of
+just being a bool.  
+
+Regardless of whether or not we were preempted, we still can look at
+pcpui->owning_proc and owning_vcoreid to figure out what the vcoreid of the
+trap/syscall is, and we know that the cur_ctx is still the correct cur_ctx (no
+carpet pulled out), since while there could be a preempt ROUTINE message
+waiting for us, we simply haven't run it yet.  So calls like yield should
+still fail (since your core has been unmapped and you need to bail out and run
+the preempt handler), but calls like sys_change_stack_pointer can proceed.
+More importantly than that old joke syscall, the page fault handler can try to
+do some cool things without worrying about really crazy stuff.
+
+9.5: Why We (probably) Don't Deadlock
+---------------------------
+It's worth thinking about why this setup of preempts and startcores can't
+deadlock.  Anytime we spin in the kernel, we ought to do this.  Perhaps there
+is some issue with other KMSGs for other processes, or other vcores, or
+something like that that can cause a deadlock.
+
+Hypothetical case: pcore 1 has a startcore for vc1 which is stuck behind vc2's
+startcore on PC2, with time going upwards.  In these examples, startcores are
+waiting on particular preempts, subject to the nr_preempts_sent parameter sent
+along with the startcores.
+
+^                       
+|            _________                 _________
+|           |         |               |         |
+|           | pr vc 2 |               | pr vc 1 |
+|           |_________|               |_________|
+|
+|            _________                 _________
+|           |         |               |         |
+|           | sc vc 1 |               | sc vc 2 |
+|           |_________|               |_________|
+t           
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+              ______                    ______
+             |      |                  |      |
+             | PC 1 |                  | PC 2 |
+             |______|                  |______|
+
+Here's the same picture, but with certain happens-before arrows.  We'll use X --> Y to
+mean X happened before Y, was sent before Y.  e.g., a startcore is sent after
+a preempt.
+
+^                       
+|            _________                 _________
+|           |         |               |         |
+|       .-> | pr vc 2 | --.    .----- | pr vc 1 | <-.
+|       |   |_________|    \  /   &   |_________|   |  
+|     * |                   \/                      | * 
+|       |    _________      /\         _________    |  
+|       |   |         |    /  \   &   |         |   |  
+|       '-- | sc vc 1 | <-'    '----> | sc vc 2 | --'
+|           |_________|               |_________|
+t           
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------
+              ______                    ______
+             |      |                  |      |
+             | PC 1 |                  | PC 2 |
+             |______|                  |______|
+
+The arrows marked with * are ordered like that due to the property of KMSGs,
+in that we have in order delivery.  Messages are executed in the order in
+which they were sent (serialized with a spinlock btw), so on any pcore,
+messages that are further ahead in the queue were sent before (and thus will
+be run before) other messages.
+
+The arrows marked with a & are ordered like that due to how the proc
+management code works.  The kernel won't send out a startcore for a particular
+vcore before it sent out a preempt.  (Note that techincally, preempts follow
+startcores.  The startcores in this example are when we start up a vcore after
+it had been preempted in the past.).
+
+Anyway, note that we have a cycle, where all events happened before each
+other, which isn't possible.  The trick to connecting "unrelated" events like
+this (unrelated meaning 'not about the same vcore') in a happens-before manner
+is the in-order properties of the KMSGs.
+
+Based on this example, we can derive general rules.  Note that 'sc vc 2' could
+be any kmsg that waits on another message placed behind 'sc vc 1'.  This would
+require us having sent a KMSG that waits on a KMSGs that we send later.  Bad
+idea!  (you could have sent that KMSGs to yourself, aside from just being
+dangerous).  If you want to spin, make sure you send the work that should
+happen-before actually-before the waiter.
+
+In fact, we don't even need 'sc vc 2' to be a KMSG.  It could be miscellaneous
+kernel code, like a proc mgmt syscall.  Imagine if we did something like the
+old '__map_vcore' call from within the ksched.  That would be code that holds
+the lock, and then waits on the execution of a message handler.  That would
+deadlock (which is why we don't do it anymore).
+
+Finally, in case this isn't clear, all of the startcores and preempts for
+a given vcore exist in a happens-before relation, both in sending and in
+execution.  The sending aspect is handled by proc mgmt code.  For execution,
+preempts always follow startcores due to the KMSG ordering property.  For
+execution of startcores, startcores always spin until the preempt they follow
+is complete, ensuring the execution of the main part of their handler happens
+after the prior preempt.
+
+Here's some good ideas for the ordering of locks/irqs/messages:
+- You can't hold a spinlock of any sort and then wait on a routine kernel
+  message.  The core where that runs may be waiting on you, or some scenario
+  like above.
+       - Similarly, think about how this works with kthreads.  A kthread restart
+         is a routine KMSG.  You shouldn't be waiting on code that could end up
+         kthreading, mostly because those calls block!
+- You can hold a spinlock and wait on an IMMED kmsg, if the waiters of the
+  spinlock have irqs enabled while spinning (this is what we used to do with
+  the proc lock and IMMED kmsgs, and 54c6008 is an example of doing it wrong)
+       - As a corollary, locks like this cannot be irqsave, since the other
+         attempted locker will have irq disabled
+- For broadcast trees, you'd have to send IMMEDs for the intermediates, and
+  then it'd be okay to wait on those intermediate, immediate messages (if we
+  wanted confirmation of the posting of RKM)
+       - The main thing any broadcast mechanism needs to do is make sure all
+         messages get delivered in order to particular pcores (the central
+         premise of KMSGs) (and not deadlock due to waiting on a KMSG improperly)
+- Alternatively, we could use routines for the intermediates if we didn't want
+  to wait for RKMs to hit their destination, we'd need to always use the same
+  proxy for the same destination pcore, e.g., core 16 always covers 16-31.
+       - Otherwise, we couldn't guarantee the ordering of SC before PR before
+         another SC (which the proc_lock and proc mgmt code does); we need the
+         ordering of intermediate msgs on the message queues of a particular
+         core.
+       - All kmsgs would need to use this broadcasting style (couldn't mix
+         regular direct messages with broadcast), so odds are this style would be
+         of limited use.
+       - since we're not waiting on execution of a message, we could use RKMs
+         (while holding a spinlock)
+- There might be some bad effects with kthreads delaying the reception of RKMS
+  for a while, but probably not catastrophically.
+
+9.6: Things That We Don't Handle Nicely
+---------------------------
+If for some reason a syscall or fault handler blocks *unexpectedly*, we could
+have issues.  Imagine if change_to happens to block in some early syscall code
+(like instrumentation, or who knows what, that blocks in memory allocation).
+When the syscall kthread restarts, its old cur_ctx is gone.  It may or may not
+be running on a core owned by the original process.  If it was, we probably
+would accidentally yield that vcore (clearly a bug).  
+
+For now, any of these calls that care about cur_ctx/pcpui need to not block
+without some sort of protection.  None of them do, but in the future we might
+do something that causes them to block.  We could deal with it by having a
+pcpu or per-kthread/syscall flag that says if it ever blocked, and possibly
+abort.  We get into similar nasty areas as with preempts, but this time, we
+can't solve it by making preempt a routine KMSG - we block as part of that
+syscall/handler code.  Odds are, we'll just have to outlaw this, now and
+forever.  Just note that if a syscall/handler blocks, the TF it came in on is
+probably not cur_ctx any longer, and that old cur_ctx has probably restarted.
+
+10. TBD
 ===========================