Allows IRQs to be disabled while proc_destroy()ing
[akaros.git] / kern / src / trap.c
1 /* Copyright (c) 2012 The Regents of the University of California
2  * Barret Rhoden <brho@cs.berkeley.edu>
3  * See LICENSE for details.
4  *
5  * Arch-independent trap handling and kernel messaging */
6
7 #include <arch/arch.h>
8 #include <smp.h>
9 #include <trap.h>
10 #include <stdio.h>
11 #include <slab.h>
12 #include <assert.h>
13 #include <kdebug.h>
14 #include <kmalloc.h>
15
16 static void print_unhandled_trap(struct proc *p, struct user_context *ctx,
17                                  unsigned int trap_nr, unsigned int err,
18                                  unsigned long aux)
19 {
20         print_user_ctx(ctx);
21         printk("err 0x%x (for PFs: User 4, Wr 2, Rd 1), aux %p\n", err, aux);
22         debug_addr_proc(p, get_user_ctx_pc(ctx));
23         print_vmrs(p);
24         backtrace_user_ctx(p, ctx);
25 }
26
27 /* Traps that are considered normal operations. */
28 static bool benign_trap(unsigned int err)
29 {
30         return err & PF_VMR_BACKED;
31 }
32
33 static void printx_unhandled_trap(struct proc *p, struct user_context *ctx,
34                                   unsigned int trap_nr, unsigned int err,
35                                   unsigned long aux)
36 {
37         if (printx_on && !benign_trap(err))
38                 print_unhandled_trap(p, ctx, trap_nr, err, aux);
39 }
40
41 void reflect_unhandled_trap(unsigned int trap_nr, unsigned int err,
42                             unsigned long aux)
43 {
44         uint32_t coreid = core_id();
45         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[coreid];
46         struct proc *p = pcpui->cur_proc;
47         uint32_t vcoreid = pcpui->owning_vcoreid;
48         struct preempt_data *vcpd = &p->procdata->vcore_preempt_data[vcoreid];
49         struct hw_trapframe *hw_tf = &pcpui->cur_ctx->tf.hw_tf;
50         assert(p);
51         assert(pcpui->cur_ctx && (pcpui->cur_ctx->type == ROS_HW_CTX));
52         if (!proc_is_vcctx_ready(p)) {
53                 printk("Unhandled user trap from early SCP\n");
54                 goto error_out;
55         }
56         if (vcpd->notif_disabled) {
57                 printk("Unhandled user trap in vcore context from VC %d\n", vcoreid);
58                 goto error_out;
59         }
60         printx_unhandled_trap(p, pcpui->cur_ctx, trap_nr, err, aux);
61         /* need to store trap_nr, err code, and aux into the tf so that it can get
62          * extracted on the other end, and we need to flag the TF in some way so we
63          * can tell it was reflected.  for example, on a PF, we need some number (14
64          * on x86), the prot violation (write, read, etc), and the virt addr (aux).
65          * parlib will know how to extract this info. */
66         __arch_reflect_trap_hwtf(hw_tf, trap_nr, err, aux);
67         /* the guts of a __notify */
68         vcpd->notif_disabled = TRUE;
69         copy_current_ctx_to(&vcpd->uthread_ctx);
70         memset(pcpui->cur_ctx, 0, sizeof(struct user_context));
71         proc_init_ctx(pcpui->cur_ctx, vcoreid, vcpd->vcore_entry,
72                       vcpd->vcore_stack, vcpd->vcore_tls_desc);
73         return;
74 error_out:
75         print_unhandled_trap(p, pcpui->cur_ctx, trap_nr, err, aux);
76         proc_destroy(p);
77 }
78
79 uintptr_t get_user_ctx_pc(struct user_context *ctx)
80 {
81         switch (ctx->type) {
82                 case ROS_HW_CTX:
83                         return get_hwtf_pc(&ctx->tf.hw_tf);
84                 case ROS_SW_CTX:
85                         return get_swtf_pc(&ctx->tf.sw_tf);
86                 default:
87                         warn("Bad context type %d for ctx %p\n", ctx->type, ctx);
88                         return 0;
89         }
90 }
91
92 uintptr_t get_user_ctx_fp(struct user_context *ctx)
93 {
94         switch (ctx->type) {
95                 case ROS_HW_CTX:
96                         return get_hwtf_fp(&ctx->tf.hw_tf);
97                 case ROS_SW_CTX:
98                         return get_swtf_fp(&ctx->tf.sw_tf);
99                 default:
100                         warn("Bad context type %d for ctx %p\n", ctx->type, ctx);
101                         return 0;
102         }
103 }
104
105 /* Helper, copies the current context to to_ctx. */
106 void copy_current_ctx_to(struct user_context *to_ctx)
107 {
108         struct user_context *cur_ctx = current_ctx;
109
110         /* Be sure to finalize into cur_ctx, not the to_ctx.  o/w the arch could get
111          * confused by other calls to finalize. */
112         arch_finalize_ctx(cur_ctx);
113         *to_ctx = *cur_ctx;
114 }
115
116 struct kmem_cache *kernel_msg_cache;
117
118 void kernel_msg_init(void)
119 {
120         kernel_msg_cache = kmem_cache_create("kernel_msgs",
121                            sizeof(struct kernel_message), ARCH_CL_SIZE, 0, 0, 0);
122 }
123
124 uint32_t send_kernel_message(uint32_t dst, amr_t pc, long arg0, long arg1,
125                              long arg2, int type)
126 {
127         kernel_message_t *k_msg;
128         assert(pc);
129         // note this will be freed on the destination core
130         k_msg = kmem_cache_alloc(kernel_msg_cache, 0);
131         k_msg->srcid = core_id();
132         k_msg->dstid = dst;
133         k_msg->pc = pc;
134         k_msg->arg0 = arg0;
135         k_msg->arg1 = arg1;
136         k_msg->arg2 = arg2;
137         switch (type) {
138                 case KMSG_IMMEDIATE:
139                         spin_lock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[dst].immed_amsg_lock);
140                         STAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(&per_cpu_info[dst].immed_amsgs, k_msg, link);
141                         spin_unlock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[dst].immed_amsg_lock);
142                         break;
143                 case KMSG_ROUTINE:
144                         spin_lock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[dst].routine_amsg_lock);
145                         STAILQ_INSERT_TAIL(&per_cpu_info[dst].routine_amsgs, k_msg, link);
146                         spin_unlock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[dst].routine_amsg_lock);
147                         break;
148                 default:
149                         panic("Unknown type of kernel message!");
150         }
151         /* since we touched memory the other core will touch (the lock), we don't
152          * need an wmb_f() */
153         /* if we're sending a routine message locally, we don't want/need an IPI */
154         if ((dst != k_msg->srcid) || (type == KMSG_IMMEDIATE))
155                 send_ipi(dst, I_KERNEL_MSG);
156         return 0;
157 }
158
159 /* Kernel message IPI/IRQ handler.
160  *
161  * This processes immediate messages, and that's it (it used to handle routines
162  * too, if it came in from userspace).  Routine messages will get processed when
163  * the kernel has a chance (right before popping to userspace or in smp_idle
164  * before halting).
165  *
166  * Note that all of this happens from interrupt context, and interrupts are
167  * disabled. */
168 void handle_kmsg_ipi(struct hw_trapframe *hw_tf, void *data)
169 {
170         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[core_id()];
171         struct kernel_message *kmsg_i, *temp;
172         /* Avoid locking if the list appears empty (lockless peek is okay) */
173         if (STAILQ_EMPTY(&pcpui->immed_amsgs))
174                 return;
175         /* The lock serves as a cmb to force a re-read of the head of the list */
176         spin_lock_irqsave(&pcpui->immed_amsg_lock);
177         STAILQ_FOREACH_SAFE(kmsg_i, &pcpui->immed_amsgs, link, temp) {
178                 pcpui_trace_kmsg(pcpui, (uintptr_t)kmsg_i->pc);
179                 kmsg_i->pc(kmsg_i->srcid, kmsg_i->arg0, kmsg_i->arg1, kmsg_i->arg2);
180                 STAILQ_REMOVE(&pcpui->immed_amsgs, kmsg_i, kernel_message, link);
181                 kmem_cache_free(kernel_msg_cache, (void*)kmsg_i);
182         }
183         spin_unlock_irqsave(&pcpui->immed_amsg_lock);
184 }
185
186 bool has_routine_kmsg(void)
187 {
188         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[core_id()];
189         /* lockless peek */
190         return !STAILQ_EMPTY(&pcpui->routine_amsgs);
191 }
192
193 /* Helper function, gets the next routine KMSG (RKM).  Returns 0 if the list was
194  * empty. */
195 static kernel_message_t *get_next_rkmsg(struct per_cpu_info *pcpui)
196 {
197         struct kernel_message *kmsg;
198         /* Avoid locking if the list appears empty (lockless peek is okay) */
199         if (STAILQ_EMPTY(&pcpui->routine_amsgs))
200                 return 0;
201         /* The lock serves as a cmb to force a re-read of the head of the list.
202          * IRQs are disabled by our caller. */
203         spin_lock(&pcpui->routine_amsg_lock);
204         kmsg = STAILQ_FIRST(&pcpui->routine_amsgs);
205         if (kmsg)
206                 STAILQ_REMOVE_HEAD(&pcpui->routine_amsgs, link);
207         spin_unlock(&pcpui->routine_amsg_lock);
208         return kmsg;
209 }
210
211 /* Runs routine kernel messages.  This might not return.  In the past, this
212  * would also run immediate messages, but this is unnecessary.  Immediates will
213  * run whenever we reenable IRQs.  We could have some sort of ordering or
214  * guarantees between KMSG classes, but that's not particularly useful at this
215  * point.
216  *
217  * Note this runs from normal context, with interruptes disabled.  However, a
218  * particular RKM could enable interrupts - for instance __launch_kthread() will
219  * restore an old kthread that may have had IRQs on. */
220 void process_routine_kmsg(void)
221 {
222         uint32_t pcoreid = core_id();
223         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[pcoreid];
224         struct kernel_message msg_cp, *kmsg;
225
226         /* Important that callers have IRQs disabled.  When sending cross-core RKMs,
227          * the IPI is used to keep the core from going to sleep - even though RKMs
228          * aren't handled in the kmsg handler.  Check smp_idle() for more info. */
229         assert(!irq_is_enabled());
230         while ((kmsg = get_next_rkmsg(pcpui))) {
231                 /* Copy in, and then free, in case we don't return */
232                 msg_cp = *kmsg;
233                 kmem_cache_free(kernel_msg_cache, (void*)kmsg);
234                 assert(msg_cp.dstid == pcoreid);        /* caught a brutal bug with this */
235                 set_rkmsg(pcpui);                                       /* we're now in early RKM ctx */
236                 /* The kmsg could block.  If it does, we want the kthread code to know
237                  * it's not running on behalf of a process, and we're actually spawning
238                  * a kernel task.  While we do have a syscall that does work in an RKM
239                  * (change_to), it's not really the rest of the syscall context. */
240                 pcpui->cur_kthread->flags = KTH_KTASK_FLAGS;
241                 pcpui_trace_kmsg(pcpui, (uintptr_t)msg_cp.pc);
242                 msg_cp.pc(msg_cp.srcid, msg_cp.arg0, msg_cp.arg1, msg_cp.arg2);
243                 /* And if we make it back, be sure to restore the default flags.  If we
244                  * never return, but the kthread exits via some other way (smp_idle()),
245                  * then smp_idle() will deal with the flags.  The default state includes
246                  * 'not a ktask'. */
247                 pcpui->cur_kthread->flags = KTH_DEFAULT_FLAGS;
248                 /* If we aren't still in early RKM, it is because the KMSG blocked
249                  * (thus leaving early RKM, finishing in default context) and then
250                  * returned.  This is a 'detached' RKM.  Must idle in this scenario,
251                  * since we might have migrated or otherwise weren't meant to PRKM
252                  * (can't return twice).  Also note that this may involve a core
253                  * migration, so we need to reread pcpui.*/
254                 cmb();
255                 pcpui = &per_cpu_info[core_id()];
256                 if (!in_early_rkmsg_ctx(pcpui))
257                         smp_idle();
258                 clear_rkmsg(pcpui);
259                 /* Some RKMs might turn on interrupts (perhaps in the future) and then
260                  * return. */
261                 disable_irq();
262         }
263 }
264
265 /* extremely dangerous and racy: prints out the immed and routine kmsgs for a
266  * specific core (so possibly remotely) */
267 void print_kmsgs(uint32_t coreid)
268 {
269         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[coreid];
270         void __print_kmsgs(struct kernel_msg_list *list, char *type)
271         {
272                 char *fn_name;
273                 struct kernel_message *kmsg_i;
274                 STAILQ_FOREACH(kmsg_i, list, link) {
275                         fn_name = get_fn_name((long)kmsg_i->pc);
276                         printk("%s KMSG on %d from %d to run %p(%s)\n", type,
277                                kmsg_i->dstid, kmsg_i->srcid, kmsg_i->pc, fn_name); 
278                         kfree(fn_name);
279                 }
280         }
281         __print_kmsgs(&pcpui->immed_amsgs, "Immedte");
282         __print_kmsgs(&pcpui->routine_amsgs, "Routine");
283 }
284
285 /* Debugging stuff */
286 void kmsg_queue_stat(void)
287 {
288         struct kernel_message *kmsg;
289         bool immed_emp, routine_emp;
290         for (int i = 0; i < num_cores; i++) {
291                 spin_lock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[i].immed_amsg_lock);
292                 immed_emp = STAILQ_EMPTY(&per_cpu_info[i].immed_amsgs);
293                 spin_unlock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[i].immed_amsg_lock);
294                 spin_lock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[i].routine_amsg_lock);
295                 routine_emp = STAILQ_EMPTY(&per_cpu_info[i].routine_amsgs);
296                 spin_unlock_irqsave(&per_cpu_info[i].routine_amsg_lock);
297                 printk("Core %d's immed_emp: %d, routine_emp %d\n", i, immed_emp,
298                routine_emp);
299                 if (!immed_emp) {
300                         kmsg = STAILQ_FIRST(&per_cpu_info[i].immed_amsgs);
301                         printk("Immed msg on core %d:\n", i);
302                         printk("\tsrc:  %d\n", kmsg->srcid);
303                         printk("\tdst:  %d\n", kmsg->dstid);
304                         printk("\tpc:   %p\n", kmsg->pc);
305                         printk("\targ0: %p\n", kmsg->arg0);
306                         printk("\targ1: %p\n", kmsg->arg1);
307                         printk("\targ2: %p\n", kmsg->arg2);
308                 }
309                 if (!routine_emp) {
310                         kmsg = STAILQ_FIRST(&per_cpu_info[i].routine_amsgs);
311                         printk("Routine msg on core %d:\n", i);
312                         printk("\tsrc:  %d\n", kmsg->srcid);
313                         printk("\tdst:  %d\n", kmsg->dstid);
314                         printk("\tpc:   %p\n", kmsg->pc);
315                         printk("\targ0: %p\n", kmsg->arg0);
316                         printk("\targ1: %p\n", kmsg->arg1);
317                         printk("\targ2: %p\n", kmsg->arg2);
318                 }
319                         
320         }
321 }
322
323 void print_kctx_depths(const char *str)
324 {
325         uint32_t coreid = core_id();
326         struct per_cpu_info *pcpui = &per_cpu_info[coreid];
327         
328         if (!str)
329                 str = "(none)";
330         printk("%s: Core %d, irq depth %d, ktrap depth %d, irqon %d\n", str, coreid,
331                irq_depth(pcpui), ktrap_depth(pcpui), irq_is_enabled());
332 }
333
334 void print_user_ctx(struct user_context *ctx)
335 {
336         if (ctx->type == ROS_SW_CTX)
337                 print_swtrapframe(&ctx->tf.sw_tf);
338         else if (ctx->type == ROS_HW_CTX)
339                 print_trapframe(&ctx->tf.hw_tf);
340         else
341                 printk("Bad TF %p type %d!\n", ctx, ctx->type);
342 }