Switches kernel trap.h #include order
[akaros.git] / kern / include / trap.h
1 /* See COPYRIGHT for copyright information. */
2
3 #ifndef ROS_KERN_TRAP_H
4 #define ROS_KERN_TRAP_H
5
6 #include <ros/trapframe.h>
7 #include <arch/arch.h>
8 #include <arch/mmu.h>
9 #include <sys/queue.h>
10 #include <arch/trap.h>
11
12 // func ptr for interrupt service routines
13 typedef void ( *poly_isr_t)(trapframe_t* tf, TV(t) data);
14 typedef void (*isr_t)(trapframe_t* tf, void * data);
15 typedef struct InterruptHandler {
16         poly_isr_t isr;
17         TV(t) data;
18 } handler_t;
19
20 #ifdef __IVY__
21 #pragma cilnoremove("iht_lock")
22 extern spinlock_t iht_lock;
23 #endif
24 extern handler_t LCKD(&iht_lock) (CT(NUM_INTERRUPT_HANDLERS) RO interrupt_handlers)[];
25
26 void idt_init(void);
27 void
28 register_interrupt_handler(handler_t SSOMELOCK (CT(NUM_INTERRUPT_HANDLERS)table)[],
29                            uint8_t int_num,
30                            poly_isr_t handler, TV(t) data);
31 void print_trapframe(trapframe_t *tf);
32 void page_fault_handler(trapframe_t *tf);
33 /* Generic per-core timer interrupt handler.  set_percore_timer() will fire the
34  * timer_interrupt(). */
35 void set_core_timer(uint32_t usec, bool periodic);
36 void timer_interrupt(struct trapframe *tf, void *data);
37
38 void sysenter_init(void);
39 extern void sysenter_handler();
40
41 extern inline void save_fp_state(struct ancillary_state *silly);
42 extern inline void restore_fp_state(struct ancillary_state *silly);
43 /* Set stacktop for the current core to be the stack the kernel will start on
44  * when trapping/interrupting from userspace */
45 void set_stack_top(uintptr_t stacktop);
46 uintptr_t get_stack_top(void);
47
48 /* It's important that this is inline and that tf is not a stack variable */
49 static inline void save_kernel_tf(struct trapframe *tf)
50                    __attribute__((always_inline));
51 void pop_kernel_tf(struct trapframe *tf) __attribute__((noreturn));
52
53 /* Sends a non-maskable interrupt, which we have print a trapframe. */
54 void send_nmi(uint32_t os_coreid);
55
56 /* Kernel messages.  Each arch implements them in their own way.  Both should be
57  * guaranteeing in-order delivery.  Kept here in trap.h, since sparc is using
58  * trap.h for KMs.  Eventually, both arches will use the same implementation.
59  *
60  * These are different (for now) than the smp_calls in smp.h, since
61  * they will be executed immediately (for urgent messages), and in the order in
62  * which they are sent.  smp_calls are currently not run in order, and they must
63  * return (possibly passing the work to a workqueue, which is really just a
64  * routine message, so they really need to just return).
65  *
66  * Eventually, smp_call will be replaced by these.
67  *
68  * Also, a big difference is that smp_calls can use the same message (registered
69  * in the interrupt_handlers[] for x86) for every recipient, but the kernel
70  * messages require a unique message.  Also for now, but it might be like that
71  * for a while on x86 (til we have a broadcast). */
72
73 #define KMSG_IMMEDIATE                  1
74 #define KMSG_ROUTINE                    2
75
76 typedef void (*amr_t)(struct trapframe *tf, uint32_t srcid, long a0, long a1,
77                       long a2);
78
79 /* Must stay 8-byte aligned for sparc */
80 struct kernel_message
81 {
82         STAILQ_ENTRY(kernel_message) link;
83         uint32_t srcid;
84         uint32_t dstid;
85         amr_t pc;
86         long arg0;
87         long arg1;
88         long arg2;
89 }__attribute__((aligned(8)));
90
91 STAILQ_HEAD(kernel_msg_list, kernel_message);
92 typedef struct kernel_message kernel_message_t;
93
94 void kernel_msg_init(void);
95 uint32_t send_kernel_message(uint32_t dst, amr_t pc, long arg0, long arg1,
96                              long arg2, int type);
97 void handle_kmsg_ipi(struct trapframe *tf, void *data);
98 void process_routine_kmsg(void);
99 void print_kmsgs(uint32_t coreid);
100
101 /* Kernel context depths.  IRQ depth is how many nested IRQ stacks/contexts we
102  * are working on.  Kernel trap depth is how many nested kernel traps (not
103  * user-space traps) we have.
104  *
105  * Some examples:
106  *              (original context in parens, +(x, y) is the change to IRQ and ktrap
107  *              depth):
108  * - syscall (user): +(0, 0)
109  * - trap (user): +(0, 0)
110  * - irq (user): +(1, 0)
111  * - irq (kernel, handling syscall): +(1, 0)
112  * - trap (kernel, regardless of context): +(0, 1)
113  * - NMI (kernel): it's actually a kernel trap, even though it is
114  *   sent by IPI.  +(0, 1)
115  * - NMI (user): just a trap.  +(0, 0)
116  *
117  * So if the user traps in for a syscall (0, 0), then the kernel takes an IRQ
118  * (1, 0), and then another IRQ (2, 0), and then the kernel page faults (a
119  * trap), we're at (2, 1).
120  *
121  * Or if we're in userspace, then an IRQ arrives, we're in the kernel at (1, 0).
122  * Note that regardless of whether or not we are in userspace or the kernel when
123  * an irq arrives, we still are only at level 1 irq depth.  We don't care if we
124  * have one or 0 kernel contexts under us.  (The reason for this is that I care
125  * if it is *possible* for us to interrupt the kernel, not whether or not it
126  * actually happened). */
127
128 /* uint32_t __ctx_depth is laid out like so:
129  *
130  * +------8------+------8------+------8------+------8------+
131  * |    Flags    |    Unused   | Kernel Trap |  IRQ Depth  |
132  * |             |             |    Depth    |             |
133  * +-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
134  *
135  */
136 #define __CTX_IRQ_D_SHIFT                       0
137 #define __CTX_KTRAP_D_SHIFT                     8
138 #define __CTX_FLAG_SHIFT                        24
139 #define __CTX_IRQ_D_MASK                        ((1 << 8) - 1)
140 #define __CTX_KTRAP_D_MASK                      ((1 << 8) - 1)
141 #define __CTX_NESTED_CTX_MASK           ((1 << 16) - 1)
142 #define __CTX_EARLY_RKM                         (1 << __CTX_FLAG_SHIFT)
143
144 /* Basic functions to get or change depths */
145
146 #define irq_depth(pcpui)                                                       \
147         (((pcpui)->__ctx_depth >> __CTX_IRQ_D_SHIFT) & __CTX_IRQ_D_MASK)
148
149 #define ktrap_depth(pcpui)                                                     \
150         (((pcpui)->__ctx_depth >> __CTX_KTRAP_D_SHIFT) & __CTX_KTRAP_D_MASK)
151
152 #define inc_irq_depth(pcpui)                                                   \
153         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth += 1 << __CTX_IRQ_D_SHIFT)
154
155 #define dec_irq_depth(pcpui)                                                   \
156         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth -= 1 << __CTX_IRQ_D_SHIFT)
157
158 #define inc_ktrap_depth(pcpui)                                                 \
159         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth += 1 << __CTX_KTRAP_D_SHIFT)
160
161 #define dec_ktrap_depth(pcpui)                                                 \
162         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth -= 1 << __CTX_KTRAP_D_SHIFT)
163
164 #define set_rkmsg(pcpui)                                                       \
165         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth |= __CTX_EARLY_RKM)
166
167 #define clear_rkmsg(pcpui)                                                     \
168         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth &= ~__CTX_EARLY_RKM)
169
170 /* Functions to query the kernel context depth/state.  I haven't fully decided
171  * on whether or not 'default' context includes RKMs or not.  Will depend on
172  * how we use it.  Check the code below to see what the latest is. */
173
174 #define in_irq_ctx(pcpui)                                                      \
175         (irq_depth(pcpui))
176
177 #define in_early_rkmsg_ctx(pcpui)                                              \
178         ((pcpui)->__ctx_depth & __CTX_EARLY_RKM)
179
180 /* Right now, anything (KTRAP, IRQ, or RKM) makes us not 'default' */
181 #define in_default_ctx(pcpui)                                                  \
182         (!(pcpui)->__ctx_depth)
183
184 /* Can block only if we have no nested contexts (ktraps or irqs, (which are
185  * potentially nested contexts)) */
186 #define can_block(pcpui)                                                       \
187         (!((pcpui)->__ctx_depth & __CTX_NESTED_CTX_MASK))
188
189 /* TRUE if we are allowed to spin, given that the 'lock' was declared as not
190  * grabbable from IRQ context.  Meaning, we can't grab the lock from any nested
191  * context.  (And for most locks, we can never grab them from a kernel trap
192  * handler). 
193  *
194  * Example is a lock that is not declared as irqsave, but we later grab it from
195  * irq context.  This could deadlock the system, even if it doesn't do it this
196  * time.  This function will catch that. */
197 #define can_spinwait_noirq(pcpui)                                              \
198         (!((pcpui)->__ctx_depth & __CTX_NESTED_CTX_MASK))
199
200 /* TRUE if we are allowed to spin, given that the 'lock' was declared as
201  * potentially grabbable by IRQ context (such as with an irqsave lock).  We can
202  * never grab from a ktrap, since there is no way to prevent that.  And we must
203  * have IRQs disabled, since an IRQ handler could attempt to grab the lock. */
204 #define can_spinwait_irq(pcpui)                                                \
205         ((!ktrap_depth(pcpui) && !irq_is_enabled()))
206
207 /* Debugging */
208 void print_kctx_depths(const char *str);
209  
210 #endif /* ROS_KERN_TRAP_H */